Bristol. With hope in our hearts…

Big Call. Not getting paid is only a wee part. Love the opportunity – the privilege – of being able to report back to the universe the gambol that is international cricket but driving *lots* into the likelihood of a significantly rain-affected match is challenging. Even I – or is it mainly I, given that the other guys ‘n gals are gainfully employed? – do have those ‘how to justify’ conversations with myself. As usual, the inviolable optimism thing kicked in. I thought about a return to slumberville (in sunny Pembrokeshire) but na: up, shower and off for 7.15am. Because you do, yes?

So Bristol – in the knowledge of rain – but with hope in my heart. Lights on. At 10.31am. Coolish windyish. No precipitation, currently. Heather Knight has won the toss and England will bowl first. Team news: Sarah Glenn and Fran Wilson are in, for England; Ekta Bisht, for India.

This means that Dan(n)i Wyatt is dropped. Strongish signal from the coach: Wyatt has been a good contributor for some years; great fielder – maybe England’s most athletic? – and proactive, attacking batter. But her dismissals – too often after about 20-odd ‘positive’ yet maybe streak-tastic runs – were prone to be howlers. Caught somewhat sloppily at cover or extra; flashing without convincing. Coach Lisa Keightley is pushing the expectation buttons, a little. ‘We have to be dynamic but effective… and consistent’. Thus the standards are raised: rightly.

England’s black tee-shirts (in case you can’t read them) say ‘We stand together against sexism/ableism/racism etc’. Worthy and pointed, given the ongoing discussions and indeed investigations into race etc, within the game. In other news, I am the only media person in the room – which is large and deliberately well-ventilated – not wearing a coat. (#FirstWorldProblems?) As we approach the start of play it appears we will get going on time, with a decent prospect for play, initially…

Brunt will open to Smriti Mandhana: two Big Guns. Full toss but extravagant swing. Single, bringing Verma into this. No slip. 3 from the over. First ball suggested Shrubsole will be *in the game*. She is, but Mandhana clips her easily enough to square leg, for another single.

Tiny bit full and the inswinger is beautifully eased past mid-on, for four, by Verma. Quality. 8 without loss after 2, India. Decent start from both sides, in fact.

Little bit of shape in the air again, from Brunt – who tends to get a bit less than Shrubsole. Mandhana untroubled. First short one slammed in: no real bounce but Verma doesn’t deal with it entirely comfortably. Swished rather, slightly aerially, behind square.

Shrubsole getting those length/line calculations right, now. The wind is assisting her inswing, coming in obliquely from our left as we sit in the Bristol Pavilion End. Touch of width offers Mandhana the chance to stay deep and cut through point: boundary.

Gear-change. Verma blazes Brunt up and over mid-off, before guiding behind point – 8 runs to the total. But then the young Indian star comes over all agricultural, heaving rather wildly, cross-batted. The mishit flies straight to Shrubsole at mid-on, who takes the catch watchfully. Big Moment – and a bit of a gift. Verma gone for 15.

Poonam Raut has joined Mandhana. Conditions breezy but perfectly playable; light fair. After 6 overs, India are 23 for 1. Decent shout from Brunt against Raut. Live it looked too high and Knight discounts the review for that reason.

Shrubsole into her fourth. Noticeable that she is bowling more cross-seamers/straight balls than in her first two overs. A Plan, or more because it’s tough to control that inswing in this wind?

Interestingly, Knight stays with Brunt into her fifth. India not exactly stalled… but the scoring rate around three, per over. Review. Redfern had given it out after a looooong look but it’s missing. Raut stays. We remain 27 for 1 after 9.

Not for long. Shrubsole’s bold, full length claims Mandhana. The batter had rather ambitiously eased back to look to cut square but the ball simply flies through. Castled. England in the proverbial box seat at 27 for 2 in the 10th over. The elegant left-hander had made 10, from 25. Skipper Mithali Raj joins Raut. Time for Sciver from the Ashley Down Road End. Two in the blockhole.

Shrubsole will bowl her sixth. She’s having a right giggle with Ecclestone, posted at mid-off. No wonder the bowler’s happy: she has 1 for 13 from that opening bundle.

India really do need to break out and Raut makes a start. Drives through the covers for four. Knight remains in there, though, for Sciver – at slip. Raut leans in again and strokes through cover; four more. Sciver responds with a genuine bouncer. 41 for 2, off 13. Cross for Shrubsole, from the pavilion.

Biggish shout, first ball. Going over. Do like the way Cross maintains her form, through delivery. There is a wee sense though, that she needs to do more with the ball, to be a top-level threat. She can find bounce, sometimes, but minimal swing or cut off the pitch.

Sciver, meanwhile, is going short against Raj, who misjudges and turns her body to take the blow. Ouch. Symptomatic, maybe, of a relatively flat-footed start, from India. Advantage England at drinks: 45 for 2 after 15. Noon, and it’s brightened, if anything, out there.

Cross. Glanced, with care, through the vacant slip area by Mithali Raj. Just the one. Full delivery is steered nicely through extra cover by Raut – 50 up. Sciver bounces the diminutive Raut. The rate of scoring plainly has to rise. Sciver again slaps one in there… but Poonam is not for biting. 53 for 2 after 17.

Mithali edges Cross wide of Knight at first/second slip. The bowler is very much doing that ‘plugging away’ thing, to some effect.

62 for 2 after 20 and we have Ecclestone, from Ashley Down. And a question: who’s going to bring the boom, for India? This has been too pedestrian for too long. Will an incoming Harmanpreet or Deepti Sharma bring something *refreshing?* Or will a message (or threat) from the coach change the vibe? Bit flat, currently – which is just what England want, of course.

A drive through the covers reminds us that a) there is a crowd b) Indians are mad for it and c) Raj and Raut do get it. Can that mini-statement be sustained?

Ecclestone has Winfield-Hill at slip but a couple of singles send her back to deepish gully. Accuweather (I’m looking and comparing with Met Office about every three seconds) suggesting we better look out from around 2 pm. 60 per cent chance of rain, thereafter. Best hope is showers – or that the marginally more optimistic Met Office offer is closer to the truth of it. Or that we get lucky.

Wow. Raut swings Cross with some violence over midwicket. Would be a fairly hearty wallop to claim a six… but it lands only a teeny bit short, if at all. (Looked to have clonked the barrier, live and not that clear on our replay – which admittedly is breaking up). India need more of this aggression but it comes with a risk: Poonam Raut miscues Cross to Ecclestone at mid-off. 83 for 3, in the 26th. The Raj/Raut partnership had reached 50 but India needed to shake this up. Enter Harmanpreet Kaur.

Glenn – the leg-spinner – will have a go from the Ashley Down Road End. She can spin it but not much sign of grip there. Back to Ecclestone. She draws a faint edge from Kaur and Jones pockets, behind the sticks. That feels significant: difficult not to immediately pile on the meteorological qualifications but 80-odd for 4 off 27 leaves India in a hole. Except the incoming Deepti Sharma has often evidenced great grit… and proper dynamism. She will need both here, to keep her side in the match. Approaching 1 pm. Weather good, England way ahead.

Predictably, Sharma steps down to Ecclestone and middles. Four, high, and beautifully straight. Then Raj does the same to Glenn. India recognise we’re in a pivotal moment. Runs must come. Can the England spinners keep their discipline? Good test upcoming.

Ecclestone – who is brilliant – isn’t flawless. One or two legside wides have crept in. Boisterous verbals and hoots as India get to 100… but in the 32nd over. Meaning run rate still barely above 3. Drinks and time to re-consider. Still no threat to play.

Like the balance that Glenn brings to the England side. Tough to keep the leg-spin option both threatening and consistent but she has made a good start to her international career; appearing to have the durability you *just might need* as a potential victim of a mid-innings onslaught. But a change; Brunt has switched and now returns from underneath us in the Bristol Pavilion End. Her first ball again has a little shape. Aware I’m a bit relentless with my Brunty-lurv but she’s looking fit, strong, determined and has shown great hands in the field as well as being focussed and economical with the ball.

Tellingly, Deepti Sharma – after having made a brief statement of positivity, early doors – has 18 off 36, as I write. Mithali Raj has 46 off 90. Do the math.

Sharma spoons one, aerially, down to fine leg – falls just short. Could be the fielder didn’t pick it up, immediately. Brunt a tad unimpressed. Again she invites a biff to leg, going shortish on or around leg stump. Then short over off stump, to Mithali. No dramas. 134 for 4 after 40.

Deepti sweeps Glenn to fine leg and beats Beaumont’s dive. Then thrashes forward past mid-off. Raj dances down and pushes for 1 to take herself to 47. Better, from the visitors. Shrubsole is back.

She is unceremoniously slapped over midwicket for four. The crowd – well most of it – love that. Raj beyond 50. Wonderful response, from Shrubsole, who surely has Sharma plum, with a ver-ry full one? Yes. Gone for a goodish 30 (which may have needed to be 50, off the same number of balls). India 149 for 5 in the 42nd. We appear to have technical issues with Sue Redfern’s links to the outside world.

Vastraka must defend one on middle, from Shrubsole, first up. She does. And now Cross has changed ends. Oops. Except she hasn’t. It’s Sciver. She bounces Vastrakar and the batter takes her on, slapping it tennis-style through midwicket for four. Quick glance at the telly to my left confirms that the run rate is currently 3.64. Not enough: hence that palpable urgency from the visitors, now.

Raj heaves Shrubsole over her shoulder, without really connecting. Vastrakar follows that with an emphatic straight drive, high, for four more. Then a mis-hit drive flies out through backward point. And a poor one from Shrubsole – best part of a foot wide – is merely helped over fine leg. Big, helpful over, for India. 171 for 5. Sciver – so miserly in the Test – is tasked with holding the charge.

Knight then turns to Ecclestone: five overs remain. Time stands still… as Mithali Raj just gets it all wrong… to a floaty one which proceeds untroubled to the stumps – the batter having presumably changed her mind then offered no meaningful stroke. Bit weird but massive, for England. Strong contribution from the Indian captain but she leaves us, on 72. End of the 46th and the visitors are 181 for 6. To make matters worse, Vastrakar promptly clatters the ball into her own foot and is clearly in some discomfort. Brunt from the Ashley Down Road End.

Loose one clips the pad and trundles off down, for leg byes. (All donations gratefully received). Feeble slice goes crushingly close to Knight, at extra cover. Vastrakar got the memo and has reached 15 off 16. Three to come, 191 for 6: back to Ecclestone.

Vastrakar has fallen on her face, trying to reverse the left-arm offie. She is plum and ball-tracking confirms. 192 for 7. Shikha Pandey has not much time to do quite a lot.

Ah. With things moving on, we have failed to welcome Taniya Bhatia, who preceded Pandey into the fray. Forgive us. Brunt will bowl the penultimate over, running in towards us, from the Ashley Down Road End. Dot balls.

The bowler, typically, is outwardly angry with a minor mis-field, from Dunkley but then – again typically – gathers to bowl an extravagant, loopy, slower ball. It’s wide but Jones gathers and stumps… or does she? Painfully close. Given out, eventually. Bhatia not hugely impressed but has to depart for 7. 197 for 8. India will barely get past 200: Ecclestone will close this out.

Goswami is in. Ecclestone beats her. Then Cross can’t quite get hold of a boom to deep mid-on. An un-explosive end to a moderate batting performance leaves England needing 202 to win this. Feels like only the weather – or *adjustments* because of weather – might prevent a home win, here. Food. Tasty beef tagine. Thankyou, guys!

The teams return. Winfield-Hill will face Goswami: Beaumont the other opener for England. No immediate threat from the skies. Great ball which leaves Winfield-Hill and ‘deserves’ an edge; finds none. Then two runs off a slight inside tickle; ball theoretically driven but instead squeezes out towards the square leg boundary. Beaumont will face Pandey.

Stifled shout. Nothing. Then follow-up is a big inswinger – doing too much? – which precipitates an unconvincing scramble for a single. But we have a review. Missing by miles. Pandey looking strong and committed but strays too straight: clipped squarish for two more. The legside wide and another tickle towards the 45 brings England to 9 without loss after 2 but there will be some encouragement for India, there.

Beaumont gets off the mark with a gift, from Goswami. Shortish ball sits up around leg stump; turned away for one with some ease. Winfield-Hill then creams one forward of point, before going aerial over midwicket – both boundaries. Good energy about the England pair, here. 22 for 0 after 4. Weather helpful.

Slightly from nowhere, Winfield-Hill nicks one and is gone for a briskish 16. Possibly left her a touch: the Indians’ delight tells you know they needed that. Enter the captain. With pleasing symmetry – almost – Lizzie on my right is saying ‘the rain is starting in 16 minutes’. (I’m guessing not but who am I to contradict our friends at Accuweather?)

Wide one from Pandey is satisfyingly clattered through the covers, by Beaumont. And another. 32 for 1 after 6, England. Great running and awareness from Knight and her partner brings another two, off the hip, sprinted. Then the cleanest of strikes from Knight races away through cover. The heavens remain supportive but plainly the home side is looking both to stay ahead of any potential Duckworth-Lewis issue and, ideally, streak to victory uninterrupted.

Knight steers another beauty through cover: four more. This is Proper White-ball Cricket. Beaumont’s flourish pops the ball down, up and then over the bowler and her stretch and clout through cover brings up 50. Exhibition stuff, this.

Finally, a moral victory from Vastrakar… but Beaumont’s missed it. 52 for 1 after 8. First view of Bisht’s fairly eccentric round-arm off-spin. Interesting – and good call to make the change. Sharma will become her spin-twin. Between them they have serious work to do: England have proceeded beyond 60 in just 10 overs. Beaumont again effects the drive-block which pings off the deck in front of her toes, before looping up and over the bowler for another boundary. She’s having fun, alright. (So am I: really would have been *so-o easy* to take the negative view of those very negative weather forecasts, this morning).

Beaumont can do no wrong: she smashes Bisht over mid-off. After 12 overs, England have maintained their six-an-over run rate, with Beaumont on an excellent 39 off 35 and Knight on 13 off 16. Very good all-round performance, this, from the home side.

Bisht is bowling around, approaching obliquely. No meaningful turn for her. Knight ver-ry cutely guides her, with soft hands, down to fine leg: a kind of no-follow-through paddle. Two.

Brief quiet period but the batters are even now alive to gently-nurdled singles: in utter control. Drinks and England are strolling home on 82 for 1. Weather is with them – if anything, improving. At this rate they will only need another twenty overs. (*Fatal*).

Gor blimey. Absolute peach, from Bisht – it looped, it span – it bowls Knight. Exceptional delivery. Gone for 18; delight for the visitors. But this brings in Sciver, who is entirely likely to be looking to re-state England’s dominance. Let’s see.

With the skies brightening – really! – it feels like we will see a game completed. We need 20 overs minimum, for that but I’m lumping on a single block of continuous, enjoyable action. India need further breakthroughs to make this competitive: reckon most of us in the ground would like to see a tightening before any sun-drenched denouement. (*Fatal revisited).

Sciver claims four – twice. The second being a notably intimidating dance down towards Bisht. Then Beaumont stoops and sweeps to fine leg, beating the fielder, to get to her 50. Fine knock. England reach 100 in the 19th over – so going at five. Not unthinkable that they might get to 202 in 35/36 overs – certainly if these two build a further partnership.

Harmanpreet Kaur will turn her arm over, from the Ashley Down Road End. She nearly makes something happen immediately but Ekta Bisht makes a right mess of a top-edged sweep… and drops Sciver. Poor effort, in truth. England are fully 40 runs ahead of where India were at the 20 over stage. Pooja Vastrakar joins us and slings one down at 67mph, to start: wonder if England might quite like that bit of pace back on the ball?

Beaumont middles one powerfully to square leg but just for the single. Vastrakar responds with a nice, floaty yorker which the England opener keeps out. Erm… the lights are on BUT I’M NOT SURE WE NEED THEM. Brighter than at any stage.

Vastrakar looks a really good athlete but England have statements to make. Both batters looking to strike and follow-through. Nice contest – and good over. 115 for 2 after 23.

Pandey is back, from Ashley Road. She gets away with a short, wide one: Sciver unable to time it. Then a deceptive slower ball. Followed by another, rather frustrated-looking miss. And a review, for a possible outside-edge. (Given not out). No contact: Sciver remains – but does she remain frustrated?

No. On-drive for four. Bisht has changed ends. Poor one is easily biffed away behind square – Beaumont going to 63. Fifty partnership up, as Pandey is cut wide for the one. No ball bowled – free hit. (Hit firmly but mid-on gets there). Repeat repeat: no ball, free hit. This time no mistake, from Sciver. Tennis-batted to the mid-on boundary. 141 for 2 after 28. 61 needed: greyer but from inside seems okay, still, weather-wise.

Beaumont blams the most fabulous, classical off-drive over extra cover… twice. The second is close-ish to the fielder but was such an elegant strike the marginal mis-time feels forgivable. Sharma switches to Ashley Down. Sciver is advancing but not beating mid-on. End of the over and England need just 49 from 120 balls. Ah. Speck of rain and the groundsmen are getting ready.

Sciver connects as fine rain suddenly sweeps in. Four. Will they just continue… or will it get too messy out there?

Anything could happen but it appears – as the players bizarrely take drinks – to have stopped raining. The third umpire is on and having discussions with the on-field officials. It’s playable and we go on. With Sharma. Sciver goes to 51, with a two to square leg. Everything points to fireworks and Sciver dances down, before clattering over mid-on. Four. When Sharma drops short, she is punished once more – it’s gunned to square leg, hard. 176 for 2, with 32 overs bowled. Last rites.

Harmanpreet Kaur has the unenviable job of stepping up from the Bristol Pavilion Stand End. Sciver dismisses a poor one to fine leg. Then the coup de wotnots: an extravagantly maker’s-name-tastic straight six. 15 needed as we enter the 34th. The batters hug… because that was a smiley moment, for England.

Goswami, from Ashley Down. Beaumont, with that characteristic low centre of gravity, pulls for four. Nine required. Harmanpreet is methodically, if not theatrically drying the ball but the singles are being picked off. Until Beaumont enjoys the moment yet more, heaving Kaur over long-on for another tremendous 6. The scores are level.

We finish with a wide. (Hmm. Would Harmanpreet do that deliberately?) No matter. This has been a hammering, a compleat performance from Ingerland (and Wales) and a particularly enjoyable day. They lose only two wickets in their reply, having bowled and fielded with genuine application, skill and consistency. They look a good side. Gratifying for all of us who have travelled to watch; it’s been a Day That Might Not Have Been. India have work to do: specifically they must find a higher tempo with the bat. On – and home – smiling.

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