Taunton.

Arrived early. On the muggy side of warm – so perfect. Summery. Feels like a big runs day but who knows? Certainly hope that India can find another level of dynamism, otherwise this could be one-sided again.

13.09 and quite vigorous warm-ups going on. Do wonder if (on a day like today) this is *entirely necessary*, to this level but hey ho – folks getting paid to organise this stuff. View from our corner is loveleeee… but askew… and not clear if we will hear announcements or see screens all that easily. No matter. Somerset is showing off and the afternoon/evening should be fantastic.

Ecclestone, Beaumont and others involved in fielding/catching rotation. Perfectly good drills going on but slight concern that these days become ver-ry long – for blokes and gals – if the warm-up stuff takes hours. Difficult to sustain energy and concentration to a maximum, endlessly, yes? Actively enjoy watching the pre-game activity. Not remotely being critical: just hope these guys are considering this angle.

13.28. Journos slapping on the sun-lotion: that soft creamy smell. Nice – as is the wee breeze wafting into our open marquee. Might be coffe time. (Instant – can’t have everything). On the team news front, England predictably are unchanged after the procession in Bristol. India make three changes: Raut, Vastrakar and Bisht are hoiked, replaced by Jemima Rodrigues, Poonam Yadav and Sneh Rana. Ooh: thunder flies.

13.52 and the Big Question is whether India can lift themselves into another, more boomtastic cultural orbit – much like the England men did some years ago? India (women) have looked lamentably behind the contemporary process, seemingly unable to shift at a rate beyond four an over, for any meaningful period. Given the resources available to the national governing body, this is an extraordianry failure.

How much of that is down to raw sexism and under-valuing of the women’s pathway is open to debate. I find it incredible that one of the world powers in the game cannot (apparently) find batters who can biff to international white-ball standards. We can’t rule out arrogance and conservatism amongst leading and established players but for the youngster, Verma, to be burdened with so much pressure as the sole attacking batter seems crazy.

India are batting and Brunt has opened to Mandhana. Peach of an away-swinger, early. India’s left-hander responds with a sweetly-struck boundary. The Indian dressing room is stationed twenty yards to my right. On the balcony, they liked that.

Okaaay, I’ll level with you, friends. Wifi carnage – or not updating carnage is intervening, here. Am a tolerant bloke but this is a test. Most of the last X paragraphs have been re-written at breakneck speed because the f***ers would ‘t update on my laptop. There may be a agap here because I can’t catch up – am switching back to The Old Way; punching stuff out on the ipad…

*Stuff we missed. Winfield-Hill drops Verma! Mandhana is OUT! (Plays on, to Kate Cross, for 22). Then India’s junior worldie blasts on, joined by Rodrigues. After 14 overs, India are 66 for 1, with Verma 41 already and her partner yet to score. The *day itself* is simply wonderful: so gawd knows what the seagulls are complaining about, so bitterly.

Rodrigues steadies her nerves (two fours) but then perishes to Cross, hoisting a leading edge out to Brunt. 76 for 2 in the 16th. Having made a good start, can India press on, with Mithali Raj supporting or ideally contributing to a further, dynamic partnership? They plainly need that – and it’s what they’ve lacked. As Raj faces Shrubsole, Cross wanders back to her fielding post with 2 for 11. Important moment?

Big, confident shout from Ecclestone, as Verma advances. Was she stumped? Jones seems keen but we await a review, from the square-leg ump. Takes some time to confirm. MASSIVE. 77 for 3. Verma made another tremendously watchable 44. England had built some pressure: she tried to respond with her trademark aggression but Ecclestone has done for her. Think most of us in the ground are now wondering if the visitors might subside, from here? With the conditions so magnificent it would feel like a crime, should the game be shortened by feeble batting.

But perhaps I do protest the visitors’ potential weaknesses too much? Hope so.
Oof! The ball bursts through Winfield-Hill’s hands, having been slashed at by Raj. Cross the unfortunate bowler but the pace off the bat barely makes that a chance. The Ecclestone and Cross combo is working well, for England. We have effectively two new batters – Harmanpreet Kaur and Mithali Raj – so (even though these two are Indian Icons, of a sort) the home side will look to continue and indeed tighten the squeeze. After 19 overs, the visitors are 81 for 3.

A change. Sciver is in. Lots of chat around Mithali’s role and whether she can transform her traditional, admittedly stylish batting into something 2021-worthy. As she plays out a maiden with carefully-steered defensive shots, we do wonder. A half-volley (from Cross) arrives, to the rescue. 85 for 3, off 20. I’m still squinting, as I peer out there. Summertime Spectacular. It’s Ecclestone, now, who’s first in the line of view. Cross is again racing in; the England left-armer is her deep third man. On the radio, Alex Hartley is notably critical of Raj’s continuing circumspection.

Sciver looks to be bowling at a reasonable lick but Raj pulls for four – to loud cheers, from her colleagues on the balcony. Slower one from the bowler. 94 for 3 from 23. So back to four an over. Time for Sarah Glenn. Could be interesting: she can spin it and of course this ground *has been known* to support slow bowling. To be honest, no screens available and the angle of the dangle makes guesswork of any possible deviation.

India have gone past 100. Kaur and Raj persist but they will know that after settling they must go again. Another moment of elegance, from Mithali Raj. Four, Sciver – mixing it up – having erred a little.

Have successfully called up Sky Sports on laptop, so now – for now – have visuals. Will report asap on degree of spin, or otherwise, from Glenn. Meanwhile, it’s Sciver banging one in there, to Raj, who has moved to 20. The bowler is an experienced and skilful operator: pace up and down and wrist position variable. Good, fair pitch, so trying to present different, sometimes subtly different challenges.

First look at Glenn with the benefit of telly. Hah! A full toss – clumped away – so no spin. Then, despite that cocked wrist and that turned hand, very little spin available, it seems. Brunt will offer a radically different contest. No obvious threat there but this may be okay, for England, if that run rate can remain subdued.

So what’s possible, or likely? 120-odd for 3 after 29 overs. Who’s to come? There *are batters* but how many of them can turbo-boost the innings? Deepti Sharma, possibly. Not clear the others can sustain any necessary barrage. If India use the overs it’s feeling like 220, to me. (That’s five an over from hereon in). India need significantly more. England I think will get that in 40 overs. Maybe less. Let’s see.

The England bowling has been goodish but not immaculate. Ditto the fielding. Glenn has offered a few outside or on leg stump and Brunt’s loopy slower-one is wide and hittable. Both Mithali Raj and Harmanpreet Kaur are set, so theoretically in a position to cut loose themselves. Raj smashes one back, low, to Glenn: another theoretical catch but not sure Chris Jordan would have taken that one. 139 for 3 after 32 overs. Drinks. Afterwards the visitors must surely push?

They do. Skier. Cross gets a caught and bowled. Harmanpreet gone, for 19. Sinking feeling? In the sense that I/we don’t want India to be all out 200, yes. But let’s be positive: Deepti Sharma, one of the visitor’s finest is joining us. She is tough, she can hit, she will get – i.e understand – what’s needed. Cross bursts in and bowls at 69mph, according to the gun.

Shrubsole is back, to try to capitalise. She – if the speed-gun is right? – also fires in two at 68/69 mph. (Possible but 64 or 5 is usual). 150 for 4 after 35, so run rate 4.29. Not enough. Mithali has 47, currently, from 69 – not bad, by her standards… but this may be the issue.

Hmm. Speed-gun. Saying 70 mph. It’s warm and Cross is trying but I wonder. Raj gets a free hit but Cross throws in a slower-ball bouncer which Raj cannot hit: it hits her, in fact, on the grill.

Sharma couldn’t score off her first five balls so no surprises that number six goes. Middled through midwicket; four, Shrubsole the bowler. Then she reaches, rather for another pull and cloths it aerially but safely towards the fielder in the deep. But we’re on the edge of something, you sense.

Yup. 160 for 5 as Deepti chips Cross rather cheaply to that same area, where Dunkley catches routinely. Pleased for Cross. Waxed lyrical about her movement and her flow previously: then – Bristol – she got little reward. Today her 4 for 30 will surely give her a fillip? With Sharma’s departure so my angst rises. Fear 200 all out and a short, non-competitive game. Rana had joined Raj, who is now just the one short of her half-century.

Rana takes Shrubsole up and over – barely – for a marginal miscue to long-on. Four. Cross returns, and looks fully extended in a good way. Rana plays a tad early and another skier flies up to Knight. It’s a dolly but the skipper juggles almost comically, before claiming the five-for for the elated bowler. 168 for 6. Good from England but the feeling rises that they have not needed to be special.

A minor lift for India, as Mithali Raj gets to her 50. 80 balls. Taniya Bhatia, diminutive and no doubt a little deflated, is in. Time for Ecclestone to mop up. Not immediately.

Sciver, from the Ian Botham Stand End. Slow then bouncy. Sharp and also cunning. Gets one to duck in, to Bhatia – hits pad. Another surge in the sun and the heat. 177 for 6 after 42.

Ecclestone. Single for Raj, downtown but Bhatia falls, caught behind, nicking. Seven down and likely to finish 70 or more behind a par score? Not a great look, for India. Bhatia made 2; done by a quicker ball, bowled full, setting her back there. Pandey is in.

She looks strong but Sciver knows too much – or at least draws another nick. Wide one and the batter swings and edges to the keeper. Ouch. This is almost cruel, now. 181 for 8 as the veteran Goswami lopes in. It may not get any easier for the visitors, as Brunt will bowl the 45th. Overall run rate 4.1. But five wickets lost for 36 in the last 11 overs.

Brunt is getting a bit of movement off the pitch: like India needed that, now. Over survived. Sciver is bowling out of the back of her hand – Goswami reads it. Then she goes one better – although Beaumont, at point, should have stopped it. A rare four.

Wee break as Raj gets some attention – not clear what the issue is. Brunt will bowl to her partner.

Misfield by Dunkley precipitates chaos… and a possible run out. The fielder firstly recovers to athletically save the four, then hurls in. Jones claims and knocks over the sticks (maybe with her elbow) but Raj has to go. Start the car. India are 195 for 9.

Mithali Raj proceeded pretty serenely – as she tends to – towards her 59. No issues with her consumption of balls today, effectively, as her anchor role was utterly central. But even she will have to look at just how the necessary dynamism is to be generated. Currently it isn’t there… and neither is the ability to withstand this admittedly strong (and strongly mixed) England attack.

We started by saying four an over is unacceptable – is an irrelevance, as England are showing, nowadays. Of course it is both politic and wise to throw in the qualification that only one team has batted here, so far. But the overwhelming likelihood is that the second team – England – will make mincemeat of this target.

Brunt is in, from the Marcus Trescothick Pavilion. Extravagant slower ball beats everything. Goswami is showing a little spirit but her principle task begins in about twenty minutes or so. The tall opening bowler may need to eviscerate half the England line-up for her side to have any chance. We reach the final over: Ecclestone will conclude.

India do reach the 220 suggested by yours truly. Credit to them for that. Goswami has made 19 and Poonam Yadav 10 when the latter is bowled, charging the final delivery. 221 all out at the close.

Do I win a fiver for that?

We resume, without Mithali Raj, who had been having some treatment on her neck, late-on during the Indian innings. Has ‘tweaked something’. Winfield-Hill and Beaumont will start the charge, for England – and I do expect it to be something of a charge. Goswami is creamed, classically, through the covers by Winfield-Hill, in the first over.

Pandey has a boldish appeal, first up, to Beaumont. Denied and they don’t review. Clutch of early wickets essential, naturally: don’t see it because the pitch is true and slowish. Plus the bowling isn’t, in my expectation going to be special – or special enough. So should be a cruise, or a blast, for the home side.

The openers will want to make a decent dent in the Indian total and then explode. If they get out then ditto for Knight, Sciver and Jones. Dunkley will probably be in at six but frankly I’m not sure she will bat. (I’m not that sure Sciver will bat – in at four, behind Knight, in all probability).

Aware how arrogant this might sound if something extraordinary happens but the batters named are so thoroughly grooved and professional that there’s not much wriggle-room there towards any diplomatic niceties. Goswami goes too wide and Beaumont clatters to the boundary. Pleasant evening. High sixties, some cloud, token, welcome breeze.

Pandey is getting some in-swing. So Beaumont is watchful. England are 13 for 0 after 4. From our position, Goswami looks enormous. She looked liked she meant it with the bat and she’s pumped, here.

Too right. She bowls Beaumont, with a full one which may have just left the England opener. Great ball – killer length. Disappointing for the batter – inevitably – but maybe crucial to the spectacle? 16 for 1 as Heather Knight strides in.

Pandey must back her partner up. She looks committed, as always but the skipper drills her beautifully along the deck for four, through extra cover. Quite a start. But fair play, the bowler responds by beating her: cruelly she also beats the keeper, meaning four more to the total. A slightly petulant throw from Pandey, which struck Knight on the pad references the bowler’s anger. India are up for it, which is good – which is right.

Huge appeal for a possible caught behind. Nope. Great stop at mid-on. Anxiety, verbals, *competitive cricket*. It has, of course, to last.

Knight, in particular, seems well-suited to seeing this out. She is classy, stoical, consistently durable. Winfield-Hill is leaving, then threading a near-yorker through midwicket for a boundary. England are 34 for 1 after 8. It brightens again – stunningly.

It’s not exactly a storm… but England are weathering it. They can inch happily forward before they go, at a moment of their choice. Our first spin, from Deepti Sharma, from the Marcus Trescothick End. Slowish and loopy. Bats left-nanded but bowls right arm off-breaks. Appeals, loudly – but it may have been an invention. Knight looks keen to race those singles. We will have spin twins: Poonam Yadav. She. Is. Tiny.

Seems weird on this majestic, cider-drinker’s dream of a night, but the lights are on. Go figure. Perhaps they help Winfield-Hill see this one: boom! Six, straight. Exciting. First six of the day: *statement*. Nine from the over.

Love the way Knight runs. She ‘hares’: not at all elegantly but with a kind of desperate determination. Says everything about her deep energy. But… she slashes just a little at Poonam Yadav and the ball is sailing short. Easy catch for Goswami at mid-off. The England captain has rather thrown that away for 10. England 49 for 2.

Sciver joins Winfield-Hill, who may throttle back a touch. Or not. She unceremoniously clonks Yadav for four. Bold – and beautifully executed. With lots of runs needed – despite that low target – had thought that we might get half an hour’s ‘re-building’, from England.

Next over and Winfield-Hill again punishes Sharma. Edgy, but brilliant. She has 31 and Sciver 2 as we break for drinks with the home side at 60 for 2.

Sciver is tall and athletic and hits hard. She gets runs. Winfield-Hill is looking both bullish and stylish, somehow. If the two of them get comfortable this may spell trouble, for India. So changes. Sneh Rana is in. The England opener is striking her cleanly. Thought strikes I *really should be* drinking cider… but I barely drink pints, these days and never the applestuff.

If India are to have any chance you would think they must shift these two, plus Jones, plus Dunkley. None of the remaining batters are utter bunnies but the current and next two would expect to score a few on here, today. Jones has quality (and strokes) and Dunkley still has a point to prove. The lull that is developing – if lulls can do that – suggests that a Cruise to Victory By Umpteen Wickets becomes more likely. So the contest, if there is to be one, needs a wicket. Sciver eases back to Rana and takes an easy single. 81 for 2 after 18.

Pandey is in from the Botham Pavilion. Fast arm. Drama! Winfield-Hill caught behind, by Bhatia, standing up. She made 42.

More drama!! Sciver has lofted one towards mid-off. Huge but maybe contrived celebration? Long wait, during which we look behind us at the temporary screen. Clear that India are having the proverbial larf: bounced, in front, clearly – and the fielder will have known it. Bit naughty, arguably, although pretty much everybody does it. Weirdly, that may fuel the anger and determination of both sides. At least, at 85 for 3, it feels like we may see a contest.

Jones is a player but we’ve seen her throw her wicket away. She may not want to do that, now. Sun still bright and warm; conditions fabulous. Runs are there but there is also some real intent, in the field. Similar focus from the batters, mind, as Sciver clips to leg and absolutely bullets to get that second.

Wow. That energy from India is seeping through – affecting stuff. Sciver has edged behind! Has this ‘non-contest’ turned? No review needed – Sciver has walked and we are 92 for 4. Dunkley is into something of a maelstrom: huge test of nerve, for her. She misses the first ball.

A Bath Gin balloon has loomed rather ominously into view. It will pass over or very close to the ground within a minute or so. Bet they can hear the chat from the fielders, up there.

We have one of those wonderful situations where runs are not that difficult to come by (really) but composure is. This is Dunkley’s first ODI. Amy Jones is relatively experienced but (without being at all malicious) I’m unclear on her temperament. She likes to flow – she can do that thing. Whether she can dig in, first, before building, we shall see. Good job I decided earlier not to drive back to Pembs, tonight.
Likely be here til 9.30.

England reach the 100 in the 25th over, to significant applause, meaning they (too) are suddenly finding that four an over barrier a challenge. Have no idea what happens from here, now. Thought Sciver and Winfield-Hill might finish this, half an hour ago!

Couple of encouraging signs, for Jones. Skilful hands and power, too as she batters two boundaries before dinking neatly down to fine leg and bolting for two more. There is a *possible* caught and bowled when she smashes back to Rana at catchable height but it’s fiercely struck. Jones has gone to 19 and Dunkley 6 as Poonam Yadav continues.

Rightly, the ball is being hit with some intent and singles are being raced. Sometimes slightly scarily. Mini break-out as Jones biffs to the boundary. Pressure and pressure-release, now – just as it should be. Couple of errors in the field: not much doubt that England are the better outfit in that respect. (mind you, etc etc)…

Deepti Sharma is greeted with a cut to the boundary. Mixed over, in truth. Dunkley will have enjoyed a couple of solid strikes. 131 for 4, off 28.

Comfort break – as so often – brings a wicket. Jones, surprisingly, is caught, off Yadav, by the sub, Yadav. 133 for 5 as the indomitable Brunt enters the fray.

Brunt can bat but can also be impulsive. She won’t like that a game she will think England should have put to bed is still live. This *is*, as Izzy Westbury has just said on radio, “all about temperament” now.

We are looking straight into a sinking sun. It’s above backward point as Goswami runs in to Brunt. Defended. Every boundary a mini-triumph, now – even when miscued. Dunkley gets Yadav away – just. Have liked Goswami’s spirit, today. She’s in again now and slapping it hard. Pad. Brunt matches her for grit: all day. However, the fiery England bowler almost falls, as the sub fielder gets a hand to a sharp cut, flashing over her head. Another escape and another ratcheting-up of the tension.

After 33 overs, England are five down, with a fairly straightforward run rate to overcome. But this is less than the half of it. We are in wild territory. Dunkley relieves just a little of the angst, by thrashing a six, off Pandey. Stunner. Still those verbals remain, out on the park – essential, surely, for India to keep the revs high?

Deepti Sharma is the latest change, from the Ian Botham Stand. Brunt clips her to leg. With a theoretical 15 overs remaining, England have 157 for 5. They need 222 to win. Do the math.

Brunt battles to get Yadav away for four more. The light is an issue in the sense that the sun is blazing but shadows – and the evening – are falling gently. Poonam Yadav is bowling so slowly it’s scary. You, as batter, can invent a thousand evils as the ball loops tantalisingly towards you. Much discussion, presumably around whether the Best Bowlers bowl now – given the lowish requirement. It’s Rana.

My latest dangerous opinion is that Brunt is likely to bring this home – quite possibly with Dunkley. Brunt is amongst the toughest, the most competitive out there. You just know she thinks England are waay the better team (and she may be right).

Poonam Yadam follows again. There’s an uneasy ease in the game. Dunkley hits Rana for four to go to 43 – may have been another misfield. That hurts. The over closes with another confident straight drive, for a single, from Dunkley. 39 overs done. 178 for 5. More balls available than runs needed: should be – ahem – a doddle. The mighty Goswami might have other ideas.

Could be her re-appearance precipitates an unseemly scramble, for a single. All safe. We have a review but it feels like another phoney war. Umpire seemed clear it was pad… and he was right. Touch of late-in-the-day purple breaking out, in the sun. Deepti Sharma has it to her right, as she comes in from the Ian Botham Stand End.

38 needed for the win as we enter the 41st. Inching home, England, with Dunkley close to a very impressive 50. Pandey offers some pace, and Dunkley can cuff it away to third man, for four. She will be thrilled to get to 53. Light going, now – sun dipping – it’s that batty time. (There must be plenty bats, local, what with cathedrals and all about).

Brunt has all the feels, now, as she gets Sharma away, through point. Four. It’s happening. India have battled better and longer and to greater effect than some of us thought probable but this is done. The event and the series needed this to be a contest and it has been. A wildish, eccentric, noisy, brash one. As a ripple of applause – a noticeably more comfortable ripple – goes round the ground, for the England 200, we start to think of home.

Goswami still offers, followed by Deepti Sharma but Dunkley’s contribution has been decisive. Brunt is enjoying a slap to leg – just for a single. The sun is finally below stand height, behind long-on, as Rana wheels in. In every sense, things are closing.

Time for a little more boom. With less than 20 needed, Dunkley carts Goswami to midwicket for another four. But mostly it’s bits and pieces.

Rana must try to avoid being clattered for the grandstand finish. She manages.

Four needed, off Sharma – two taken. Then one.

Brunt should finish this. She does. Her emphatic pull and characteristic fist-pump are the last of it. A scrambling, flighty, gallumping, consistently inconsistent game which re-establishes at least a little credibility for India – when they might have had none. Fifteen balls remaining, five wickets unspent, England the winners. The ground is an indescribable glory, bathed in arrogant, defiant, humble, disappearing sun. Trainwards, with haste.

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