Cobblers.

It’s only sport. Given that I’ve spent most of the last 48 hours doing the family visiting-thing at our local Emergency Unit I should be well-placed to remember that – to engage Philosophically Proportionate Mode. Ain’t always easy, though, eh?

Not when after what feels like a lifetime of trying to click into hospital wifi/phone signal you snatch a buffertastic update or two on the cricket and it unleashes a Ragin’ Fury, near as dammit. (Diversion but… was it Desperate Dan who flew into Ragin’ Furies? Or who? Fluttering right out there at the shadowy extremes, that one). Anyway, one minute we’re eyeballing a heart monitor, the next I’m watching Jason Roy ‘dance down’.

Dance down? Was more like a paralytic meander – a pre-chunder slalom to the pub khazi. With added air-punch. A catastrophically uncool Dad Dance, under a cruelly searching spotlight. (O-kaaay. Did say Ragin’ Fury).

But maybe that’s not how you saw it? Maybe you either drift easily, in that flow of positivity – that ‘this is what he does’ argument, or you really deeply commit to the idea that Roy, having been selected for his brilliance as a gladiatorial, instinctive smiter of absolutely bloody everything anyone slings down at him, is ab-so-lutely entitled to do what it says on his tin.

I say cobblers to that. I could try and be more measured – for fear of sounding reactionary, for fear of losing half my followers, for fear of stirring philoso-hostilities – but that would be a betrayal of my own instinct. Where many are saying ‘express yourself’ I say cobblers. Where that lazy-macho coaching mantra swoops in, defending the gutsiness, the stay-trueness, the incomparable and essential free-spiritedness of the batsman, I say cobblers.

Why? Because not then. Because embarrassingly stupid. Because repercussions on team-mates, because ushering in terminal momentum against. Because there’s an Ashes maybee already on the line. Because Smart Cricket you utter donkey, not mindlessly Positive Cricket.

*However, note not inconsequential footnote to follow…* dude, once you’ve been in there for two hours and have 78 not out and that wonderful eye is in and the game is petering out, then maybe. Maybe clatter that chirpy Australian barsted to the boundary, then.

Expect there were discussions, pre that knock – and probably pre the Roy selection. Fair enough. “Jase, you’re in there to blaze a trail, whenever possible”. But if there were no caveats – cobblers. Ridiculous.

Why? Because Test Cricket: a test over time. Meaning sometimes a test of skill and patience as well as hand-eye.  Meaning bravado can be earned or ‘expressed’, possibly but is measurably, in this genre of the game, more likely to be exposed for the cowardly fraud it so often is. If Root or Bayliss waived away all or any responsibility to contemplate erm, responsibility – cobblers.

The shot itself was a wildish, unbalanced hack. Roy’s exit, sharpish, utterly castled, smacked of humiliation and therefore offered the gift of triumph to the bowler, to Australia – stupid and irresponsible in a moment that calls for intelligence, for smart cricket.

So if Bayliss defends him, out of duff loyalty or (worse still), because Positive Cricket was the agreed approach… cobblers. They have insulted our intelligence. For all that they might argue that their way is the way of courage, it’s the way of the fool who hides behind the easy, unthinking swipe.

Day 4. The (non)denouement?

So back again. With another full day of cricket possible. The overwhelming likelihood of a draw hasn’t entirely thrown a blanket over us Meedya Peeps’ enthusiasms – in fact the various theories about what the teams have been trying to do, these last coupla days, have kept discussion lively – but inevitably the prospect of a slow grind towards anti-climax does challenge/will challenge our levels of attention, no doubt. Forgive us.

I do hope to stay with it. In fact, I may note to the universe that I expect to be less critical of a slide towards no-result than some of my eminent colleagues have been. (Go read the previous blogs… and maybe compare).

Check my twitter. Pre their stretching of muscles etc etc, England had a circular pow-wow in front of us. (Have posted an admittedly rather ordinary pic). Impossible and inappropriate to eaves-drop but it had the look of a Proper Moment, where Robinson (the coach) may have *had words*. I liked the look of it.

Have no idea what he said – and could speculate and may, later – but I liked the look of it. The coach should be shaping the will, the aura, the direction of all of this. Not just for today or even for this series: England must find or re-discover their intent. Robinson has therefore to both host and lead discussions.

Hearing right now from the ICC statistician Marion Collin that today’s game MUST LAST at least 91 overs. There is no option for a handshake (over a draw) before that. I have also heard from a ver ver reliable source, that Australia will not shake until the latest possible second. Because they want(ed) to win… a contest.

There will be flak flying if this does peter out. The media are already pretty feisty about lack of ambition (actually from both sides). Could also be that the teams will be blaming each other – that this might introduce a little spite – if we spend all day in Doursville. Soon find out. Molineux is opening up to Sciver.

Quiet over, in which England get to 200, for 6. Then Perry, from the river. 7-2 field with about 42 hectares unprotected between Schutt, at fine leg and Molineux at mid-on. Guessing Perry might mostly bowl wide of off.

Molineux bewilders Shrubsole into a play and a miss. Some turn. Then the batter fails to connect with a ver-ry short one – a gift. The general vibe is erm… relatively non-dynamic, maybe especially from Sciver. Weirdly.

Sciver responds to my barb with a four, swung to leg.  👊🏻

Shrubsole takes 7 off an over from Perry without looking entirely fluent before advancing-but-missing against Molineux. Good ball beats her and she is easily stumped, by Healy. No blame attached in terms of Shrubsole’s intent but for me she has not looked like a mid-order bat. Molineux now has four wickets and looks likely to claim a five-fer on debut. England 214 for 7.

Marsh has joined Sciver. They are looking to both survive and to score. Fair enough. Gardner is the first bowling change, for Perry.

Sciver charges and lifts elegantly, with power, over the bowler’s head: an emphatic four. Marsh follows that with a nice back-drive off a short ball from Molineux. Decent, now, from England. The bowler responds with a teaser that again spins and beats the outside edge. Some good, watchable cricket just now.

Gardner spins it and so does Molineux. Enjoying watching. England aware (of course) of that imperative to get to 271 pronto so some expansive shots punctuate the general Aussie-on-topness. Marsh (England’s last batter?) feasts on a rare full-toss from the right-handed bowler, ushering it confidently through the covers. 238 for 7.

Vlaeminck is back, from the River End. Good to see. She hustles then runs and lashes it through nice and quick. Second ball is a medium-intimidating bouncer, which Marsh steps away from. I’m guessing the batter is actually finding this a little scary. Good over.

The youngster’s next over – bowled largely around the wicket – again has Marsh hopping. She survives, having played more than one delivery with both feet off the ground and England are 242 for 7 at drinks. The lights flutter into action as clouds waft across.

Jonassen, who has bowled tidily but less threateningly (for me) than her spin partners, continues from the Pavilion End. It’s markedly cloudier but we are not expecting rain.

Vlaeminck errs to leg-stump and Sciver clips away nicely . Four to fine leg, taking the batter to 86. Sciver’s done well but has remained a notch down on that idealised Dynamism Quotient. But okaay, there is context here.

Sciver goes. Firstly she does that familiar, snatchy-wristy thing where she plays way across a straight one: on this occasion the leading edge loops high but straight beyond the bowler – Jonassen – to safety. Then, however, she misjudges and plays on, agonisingly. 252 for 8.

Vlaeminck at Marsh, then the incoming Ecclestone. Wow. A short of half-tracker! But harmless. The bowler does stray a little – that’s her reputation – and another one down leg is neatly dispatched, by Ecclestone. Four.

Swift word about Tayla Vlaeminck. And Fast Bowling. Great to see her racing in but did you know that she’s been through a whole series of operations? Find that rather depressing – the thought that everybody bowling quick finishes up significantly hurt by the process. Cricket must do this Looking After The Quicks thing so-o much better.

Three boundaries bring England to the brink of the follow-on total of 271. (Two to Marsh then a blow over the top, from Ecclestone). Soon we’ll know how England intend to erm, chase out a win, from here.

Drama drama. England go past that key figure but to general incredulity in the Media Centre, they do not immediately declare. Two mins later, however, Marsh is l.b.w. sweeping to Jonassen… and Knight calls them in! We’ll get a few overs in before lunch. (5, it turns out).

Really interestingly, Rachael Haynes is opening, with Healy. Ecclestone first, for England, from below us in the Pavilion End. Refreshingly tense first over: appeals, misses and scratchy-nervy batting.

Nice bit of swing for Brunt. She could be a threat. Healy is watchful.

When she breaks out, off a wide one, Beaumont cannot stop the square-drive. Should have. The frustration for England is compounded when Healy encourages the next delivery round the corner and Taylor’s dive to leg is beaten. Four more. 8 for 0 off 2.

You’ve got to love Brunt. (Well, maybe you haven’t but) she’s Fully Committed. She’s bowling full and well and *believing*. She’s even managing a pret-ty convincing glare, at Haynes. It may all well be fraudulent but I like it.

Notable that Ecclestone has led this ahem *charge*. Not bad for a young ‘un. Plainly Robinson recognises she is a prime threat – one to be trusted with a huge moment, even if it turns out to be a charade of a huge moment. Ecclestone ahead of Shrubsole, partly of course because she is ver-ry different (and because of conditions) but also because Ecclestone has landed, as a force. Australia go for their tuna salad at 13 for 0.

Extraordinary start, after lunch! Marsh claims both Healy and Haynes! Fabulous delivery, in particular to claim Healy – angled across but straightened sharply. Haynes l.b.w. to something a little less explosive.

Extraordinary (with all due respect) to find Marsh this unplayable but as she comes back for her second over – after a decent one from Ecclestone – she is feeling kindof thataway. It means a real spike, of course, in the intensity.

Ecclestone has a big shout. Knight lung-burstingly chases a lost cause. The crowd stir. Australia are genuinely finding it tough, amassing a ver-ry streaky 23 for 2 in the first ten overs.

Huge appeal – but one that built, suspiciously, I thought – as Ecclestone beats Lanning. Not given; correctly. Note again that England have THREE spinners plus Heather Knight in the side… for this moment, precisely? It’s tough, right now, for both Perry and Lanning – and they’re decent, right?

14.15 with Aus now at 43 for 2. We may be kidding ourselves but this feels like competitive cricket – meaningful cricket. Credit to both sides, on that.

Ecclestone going well enough but Marsh has been exceptional. And turning it more than I remember. An England appeal-fest in progress: Ecclestone is denied one that, on review, was on the money. Unfortunate.

Knight has been doing that Trescothick kneeling-at-second-slip routine. Almost looks comical – maybe especially with her exceedingly grubby-looking sweater. Australia are now 50 for 2 and their lead is 195 runs.

Slight sense that Ecclestone may just be tiring. Dragging down a couple and they are tending to get punished. Marsh will continue from the River End but do wonder if we may see a change (from underneath us) next over. As I say this – not before, I promise – Gordon is warming up.

Gordon to come, then. Mixed, from the Scot. At least three four-balls – one of which is dispatched. But also the wicket of Lanning, off possibly the worst pie of the century, slung loose and highish: Elwiss takes a decent catch at extra cover. Horror-show for the Australian skip, delight and some embarrassment, may-beee, for the bowler?

The visitors suddenly three down… but over 200 ahead. So this may all be a charade, yes? But here, at this moment,with the action in front of us, it feels like an entertaining day of Test Cricket – it really does. Mooney and Perry mean it… and so do England.

Elwiss replaces Marsh, the thinking surely being that her medium-pacers may grip in the surface a tad more than Shrubsole’s. (We haven’t seen Shrubsole yet, this innings). Perry has by this stage engineered her way to 37 and Mooney has 18.

Double-change, thereafter, as Ecclestone returns, starting with a loosener which Perry can scuff away to fine leg.

Sense that Australia are beginning to raise it; not remotely boomtastically yet… but a tad. Mooney we know can smash – and often does, in shorter format cricket. Against Ecclestone, she whips one to leg, only to see it stick in either Beaumont’s grateful hands, or her midriff, or both. Gone. Beaumont does three laps of Somerset in delight. 105 for 4.

So conditions have been relatively testing for batters. Even Perry has had to ‘work at this’: she even has a moment of concern, or two – the latest over a possible run-out, which she narrowly survives. Then she gets to fifty, again with a fluent cut off Brunt.

Many of my colleagues protest when this isn’t the cue for a declaration. At 132 for 4, with Australia 278 ahead – and with England needing about 7 an over through the remaining overs – why wouldn’t Lanning call them in? Because they want a handful more, before they try to make another statement, against an England batting line-up out in the middle… but hopeless. Plenty mind-games. Tea.

For me, plenty folks in the Press Corps and on telly (or both) are being overly bullish about the Playing To Win, Or Not thing. Think it’s interestingly macho – and yes, a fair few of them are women – but not sure they are allowing enough for a) human nature b) human frailty c) the needle in play, here d) that thing where you do the last thing your opponent (your enemy?) wants. I think Aus will declare, here. Soon.

Shrubsole and then Elwiss after tea. Jonassen – a more-than-decent bat – punishes the latter for four and move to 18. Shrubsole, who is of course not now bowling in Hoof-friendly conditions, seems out-of-sorts.  My hunch is we may go back to Marsh and Ecclestone, imminently.

We have a break, for an injury to Taylor,  affecting her shoulder or upper chest. But she will continue.

Shrubsole bowls a goodish yorker which Perry gets something on… but it squeezes past Taylor and on to the boundary. Perry has 64 and the lead goes to 300.

Presently – sorree but we are all drifting a wee smidge now – Knight comes in from the river for her first go. Her second ball is a foot down leg. Her third has Jonassen, plumb. 168 for 5, Jonassen made 37, tidily enough.

So The Change works again. Hilariously, Knight’s final ball surpasses the earlier contestant for Worst Ball of the Century and the incoming Molineux absolutely carts it to Cow Corner for four.

Shrubsole is still with us and follows. She’s persevered and she beats Perry outside off.

Wilson, on for Taylor, is nearly at the centre of the action – or phoney-action(?) Molineux, who has mistimed more than once, chips Knight towards her, at cover. Wilson reaches high but the movements seem off-kilter. She gets a hand to the ball but cannot hold on. Mildly amusing that the England skipper’s lack of zip, pace, spin and particularly bounce is creating issues, here.

Gordon is in from the Pavilion End. She continues, in short, to offer too many full-tosses and is punished again, by Molineux. Australia lead by 340, at 195 for 5.

Mostly, Perry and Molineux are both looking comfortable. The latter creams one through cover; she has 28. We *just don’t know* what’s been said in the Australian dressing-room but that declaration still ain’t a -comin’. Is Lanning really going to bat through? Find that difficult to believe.

Increasingly expansive now, Molineux, in swinging across to leg, is ultimately bowled off the pad, by Gordon. Gardner has a look at Gordon for one ball, then strikes her for the first six of the match, straight back over her head. Fabulous.

The scoreboard suggests 18 overs remain. Perry, on 76 has shown fascinatingly little inclination to charge towards her hundred – which again looked there for the taking. Gardner, meanwhile, is charging… and out, caught, by Beaumont, for 7. We look to the sidelines, as Perry twiddles her bat, mid-pitch. Lanning is apparently asking a question, or awaiting an answer.

The captains have agreed on the draw: Australia have retained the Ashes.

The circumstances are extraordinary but I am not as outraged as many in the Media Posse. Not sure what this says about my judgement but I’m generally comfortable being something of an outlier. I hope I’ve covered the thinking behind my thinking. Congratulations Australia – see you in Bristol.

Reflecting over a much-needed glass of red. (Cheers).

Still more at ease with the alleged Aussie cop-out than some and don’t support the idea that this has been damaging to Test Cricket for Women.

It may not have been as bold as some might have liked but maybe give the players, the captains, the coaches a little slack on that? Dynamically edgy cricket is of course desirable but how often are we actually going to see that, in Tests, realistically?

There’s an argument that the relative ‘slowness’ of Test Cricket is part of what makes it what it is.  (Again I stress that this may not be ideal, or what the game either ‘needs’ or should aspire towards but *maybe* neither Lanning nor Knight have entirely traduced the essence of all that, here?)

So. There has been in my view both some ver-ry astute and legitimate criticism… and some posturing around this. I’ve enjoyed – yes, enjoyed – a good deal of what I’ve seen. The obvious imperfections of the third and fourth days really haven’t turned me off: indeed, I hope Women’s Tests can grow, from this.

Day 3, Taunton. #WomensAshes.

 

Bright, refreshing and loo-king good as we approach start-time, in Taunton. Players out there, enjoying the breezy sunshine: what a bonus it would be, for all of us, to be able to enjoy long periods of play.

The forecast, which has been ‘evolving’ pretty constantly over the hours, is now suggesting – wait for it – a full day’s play! So we may get a match, a contest of some sort, even though we think we know which direction the honours will be heading.

Doom-mongers may possibly be juggling: might England be better slinking away after two more rain-affected days,  as opposed to enduring sustained cricket (and potentially a torrid time) against a roaring Australian attack? Meaning there is an argument that Psychological Damage is in play, here. But whether they stand and fight, as it were, or merely see out the next day or two (with or without meteorological interference), England may suffer a further knock to their collective belief.

My hunch is that rather than do the Sensible But Dangerous Thing – i.e. try from the outset to force the score, because they have to win – England will, when the time comes, inevitably look to settle in during a Trauma Avoidance Phase. (Even given that imperative to get big runs early, is it not human nature, when confronted with the very real possibility of a humiliation, to mitigate against that… a bit? ) 10.54am. We’ll soon find out.

It will be Marsh to Jonassen. We can safely assume it won’t be long before Australian batters *challenge* the England bowling, eh?

Brunt, from beneath us, at the Pavilion End. Quietish. Mooney and Jonassen ‘having a look’, for a bit. As soon as they feel comfortable they must surely launch. Then I might, on the fall of a wicket, throw Gardner in there with licence to go absolutely wild in the jungle – as it were – look to really stick it to England, whilst keeping them hanging on for that declaration.

Not knowing is kindof undermining, yes? All speculation and probably cod-psychology. Loyal followers will know I major in that. 👊🏻

Brunt slaps one in against Mooney. Leg stump. Hits Mooney in the ribs. Next ball is too full and the batter on-drives for four. 349 for 5 at the end of the over. Lots of cloud cover, again.

Imagine Brunt is a player that the opposition (any opposition) loves to hate. But I like her bullish, gruntaciousness – her Fast Bowler Attitude.

As I write this she draws a loose-ish shot, from Jonassen and Sciver takes a sharp catch – yes, a sharp catch! – at gully. Not an earth-shattering moment (repeat, already feels like the game is gone) but a good one, for England. End of the 138th and Australia are 356 for 6 – enter Molineux.

Half-decent runout opportunity – not taken. Marsh, the gatherer, is only ten yards away from the sticks as the batter scrambles. Would have been out. Missed.

Laura Marsh continues, in tandem with Brunt. Mostly tightish, the both of them. Shrubsole is the first change, for Brunt. When she goes full, full, Mooney again drives confidently through mid-on: four more. In bright sunshine, now, with a strongish cross-wind assisting any potential in-swing, for the bowler. 370 for 6.

Undignified miscue, from Molineux, off Shrubsole spirals up and over mid-on, having struck high on the bat. Landed safely. Then Mooney lifts one up and over Ecclestone, again finding the wide-open spaces.

Soon after, England concede four overthrows as Marsh, probably thinking the ball may hit the stumps, allows it to pass. More damagingly, Ecclestone has not backed-up. Have previously identified the young spinner as a relatively weak fielder, I will not revisit that issue again just now.

The debutant Molineux middles a beauty out behind point for four, from Shrubsole. Might that be the sign for her to go up a notch?

Marsh is still there, at the River End and getting a little dip and turn. She is offering a question or two rather than a threat, though, I’d say. Know Australia have a bunch of left-handers but find it notable that Marsh has bowled as many as 33 overs, *so far*.

Ecclestone replaces Shrubsole. Bowls a maiden, including one which although well left, by Molineux, pressured the off-stick. Despite the goodish, consistent work from Marsh, I fancy Ecclestone is a more likely wicket-taker, now. Go figure.

Drinks, at 388 for 6, with 148 overs bowled in the innings.

As we resume, Molineux dances down to Marsh, again slightly miscues the lofted drive but gets enough of it to clear the offside field.

The longer the game goes on, clearly the more urgency affixes to the England response. Think maybe Australia like the sound, the feel of that; it may open the door to the collapse they will be hoping to stir. So on Australia go, with Mooney clouting two successive fours off Ecclestone. We go through the 400 mark.

Fifty partnership is also up, after Molineux beats Knight in the covers. *Do wonder* if it was stoppable but another  nice shot from the young debutant – into her twenties, now.

But no further. Ecclestone beats her with the flight, rocking back, bowled, on 21. Encouraging knock, though, from Molineux. 408 for 7. This brings in Gardner, whom I like as a batter and bowler. She may, if she gets in, be *entertaining*.

Scivers slings an awful one substantially down leg. The breeze may have been a factor… but pretend it didn’t happen?

Mooney rushes then dives through for her fifty. Safe, despite the throw coming in from Brunt. Has played well – intelligently.

Then drama. The batters get the signal to really go. Mooney swings and edges, high, high behind the keeper and behind Amy Jones. But Jones races back intently and clutches on: best bit of fielding we’ve seen. With that excellent catch, Lanning calls her team in, one eye on the time – 12.35ish. Australia have declared on 420 for 8.

We look forward to an intense period… and to seeing the young quick, Vlaeminck, as well as wossername? Perry. And maybe Schutt. England will have a deeply, richly nervy 15 minutes to ‘survive’. Unsurprisingly, it’s going to be Perry, from the River End.

Jones looks tall. She raises that bat characteristically high in the ready position: she can leave the first one. The fourth she tries to clip off the hip, making no contact but offering the chance for a leg-stretch. Bye and England are off.

Fifth ball does for Beaumont, almost. Is full, swings away and the opening bat is lucky, arguably, to miss it. Final delivery is a sharpish bouncer – maybe to *ask questions* of that thumb?

Like Schutt a lot but mildly disappointed that she follows:  we’ll have to wait, for Vlaeminck. However when we see how much in-swing Schutt is getting, it all makes perfect sense. Going to be tough, this, for the locals.

Too right it is. An absolute worldie (from Perry, need I say?) does for the generally wonderful and watchful Beaumont. Swings and nips away, I think, off the pitch, a little. Byootiful ball. Given that Beaumont is often England’s most durable batter, this is a disaster. 1 for 1.

Rightly, maybe, Knight will come in at 3. She will see out that third over – the final one before a no-doubt shell-shocked England retreat to try to force down some fodder. I’ll do the same. We can only reflect on another moment of real quality from Ellyse Perry… and look forward to (or fear) the afternoon/evening sessions. Bon appetit?

Post-lunch, predictably, a quiet period. England’s charge to glory on hold 😉. No, what I mean is, no further wickets. However much Jones and Knight are conscious of that need to come over all over defiantly positive, they are going to sit a while. They do. Australia are persisting with Perry, from the River End and Schutt, with her trademark Adam Ant smear, from the pavilion.

Knight (actually) goes to 15 not out in decent time, off 23 balls and having taken two fours off Perry in the ninth over. Very different shots, too; straight on-drive and lovely easy cut behind point. Dare we say she looks well set? (*Fatal*).

First change is Molineux, for Schutt. She is left-arm, finger-spinning. Bit like Gordon’s action, kindofan eleven o’clock sling. She is followed by Vlaeminck.

She no-balls. Then slaps one ver-ry wide past Healy’s legside dive. She will be nervy and it’s showing. Another one is fired substantially down to leg.

Know what, I’d rather she keeps running in to her max and doesn’t stress too much about the rangefinder. Reckon Lanning and the rest will be encouraging her to do just that and keep believing. Even after Knight dispatches her through extra for four. Keep believing, you beautie.

At the other end, Molineux has just turned one almost twice as far as any of the England spinners. Which woke Jones right up. But no dramas. At the end of Vlaeminck’s next over – the thirteenth, a maiden to follow that wayward first effort – England are 40 for 1. The young quick is bowling around 71/2/3 mph.

Liking Molineux, coming around to the slightly becalmed Jones. The batter tries to break out and is fortunate to survive a medium-reckless thrash-drive to off. Falls out beyond the circle of fielders.

Vlaeminck cannot sustain the pressure, Knight glancing from the hip and finding Schutt at fine leg. A misfield goes to the rope. Fifty up in the over. Jones still not looking entirely in her flow but when Molineux offers a full-toss, she gratefully accepts. Four straight. We are 55 for 1, as the batters take a wee drink.

Jonassen, from the river. Pie, short, dispatched, by Jones, followed by a drive for four more, through mid-off. A third poor, short delivery is similarly dispatched. Thirteen, from the over and a significant if temporary lightening of English worries. The Trauma is being avoided. (For now).

Ah. Another peach, from Molineux. Flighted, dipped and turned past the outside edge. A reminder of how precarious things can be. Both batters looking largely settled… but that was a fabulous, challenging delivery. At 22 overs – and Proper Drinks – England are a now creditable 80 for 1.

Hah. We might argue that the drinks break, the break in concentration, does for Knight. And/or we might congratulate Molineux, who has the England skipper l.b.w. sweeping a full, straight ball. Certainly think that the young spinner has shown well – and therefore maybe has earned the wicket. 80 for 2.

England have to win this, somehow. Which means that Australia have to bat again. Much discussion around this, in the Media Centre.

So, for England to be proactive towards the possibility of a win, they will have to declare, early, because otherwise, there is no time. (Know we’re talking longshots here and that it’s probably more likely that England will be dismissed than force the issue through declaring. Up to Australia, of course, whether they then look to amble towards a draw or accept the challenge and chase a win). Time is everything – or time and the willingness or otherwise to offer or accept the gamble.

Amy Jones, who has had a difficult time, earlier in the series but who can, as they say ‘play’, hoists Molineux confidently straight, for four, to go to fifty. Then she clubs her through cow corner to take England to 95 for 2.

From the opposite end, it will be Gardner, for her first foray in Tests. She tends to spin it. Bold flight but nothing too alarming for the batters, first up.

Jonassen has switched to the Pavilion End. England get to 100, for 2, in the over.

Gardner, returning, does get meaningful spin. Elwis, now on 6, almost embarrassed.

Minutes later, that same batter is run out, following good work from Bolton. Tightish but she was out by a few inches on the bat-slide. Elwiss made 9 from 39, so her contribution was on the quiet side: the incoming Sciver will have to contend with the returning Perry. Could be a fascinating phase; arguably England’s most dynamic two batters in… and the Aussies ‘up and about’.

In fact Perry’s first over back is mixed; no-ball, straining for pace but also a shortish, sharp one that nips back and buries itself into Jones’s thigh. As we approach tea, the ‘goddess’ of yesterday (and yesterday’s blog) will follow Jonassen for a further over – her seventh. She comes around to Jones and offers width, with fielders in the third man through to extra cover sector. Bait not taken and we retire for further refreshment with the home side at 118 for 3.

Did I mention Kangaroo Man, yet? Nope.

Earlier, whilst perambulating with my new soul-sis’ Selina Steele (of Aus News Corp) we found ourselves in conversation with a young geezer in a shockingly yellow kangaroo suit. Asyado. Turns out he was on his ‘stag day’: he had asked for a Cricket Day Out but the forfeit – insisted upon by Best Man etc – was the costume. The groom-to-be is English. Weirdly, he appeared to be sober.

After the resumption, Jones advances to Molineux and drives uppishly, looking to ‘move things along’. She miscues a little and finds Haynes at mid-off. Easy, waist-high catch. 119 for 4.

Taylor – traditionally, the no. 3 bat, remember – may need to do something special. She gets a freebie from Molineux which she clatters on the full through midwicket. She cannot, however, go on.

Tucking the bat behind the front pad, she is plumb, to the off-spinner, who is having a good day. Plenty of bat on the ball but plainly after pad. Taylor has undone herself a little and may have exposed England, now: this on a pitch that is no minefield. Brunt is in and she is a fighter but this feels like a tipping point.

After 50 overs, England are 140 for 5 and the chatter may be turning more again to that Widening Gap Theory. The home team have looked comfortable enough on occasions but have again proved vulnerable to the test-over-time experience. Some good, solid cricket rather than absolutely inspired cricket is proving enough, for Australia.

Brunt is morally defeated twice in a row by Molineux but the ball finds a way to fine leg, bringing up the 150. It’s beautiful and bright, momentarily. Pity we Meedya Types have no sight of the iconic Church of St James’s which sits to our left – it must be looking splendiferous.

With Australia palpably, might we say terminally on top, Brunt and Sciver are seeing things through. Which means time disappears.

Because this suits nobody (really) Sciver goes after Molineux, smashing her rather unconvincingly and aerially towards Perry. Ver-ry tough to see (even with replay) whether that was a genuine chance. Whatever, Sciver endures.

Soon after, another pearler from Molineux draws an edge which falls narrowly short of Lanning at slip. We go to more drinks with England hanging on; 168 for 5 the score.

Vlaeminck is back for the 61st. Bowls a couple of genuine bouncers and is consistent; will settle her, you would think.  Minutes later, Brunt is the first to hook one at head height. She controls it well.

Sciver has played incredibly straight by her whip-wristed standards so I applaud her fifty, in the 65th over. Brunt, her partner, is on a princely (princessly?) 14 off 67 balls. This is not Brunt-like but can only reflect the state of the game, which is not exactly on pause but almost, despite the theoretical urgency.

Are England now seeing out today? On the basis of what? Is the main driver here (as I may have suggested earlier) Trauma Avoidance? It’s both a nonsense and a completely natural instinct. ‘We do not want a whitewash. We won’t let these buggers crush us. A worthless draw is *actually not worthless*’.

Gardner is back. Her first ball turns and ricochets off Brunt’s carefully applied bat… and pad… and dribbles through onto the stumps. 189 for 6.

Shrubsole is in. Not entirely confident that she’s in the kind of nick that will restore some English Pride but she has previous; she has shown a certain level of grit. Just not recently, from memory.

Gardner has her first Test Wicket, then. And now she can go on to enjoy and even luxuriate in Australia’s utter dominance. She can flight it, rip it with rare freedom. Look out – I think there may be more to come from that arm of hers. 192 for 6.

Ditto most of this, for Molineux. She can toss it up without issue. To Shrubsole she now has four fielders around the bat and we have already seen that she can spin it. Tellingly, Sciver has disappeared, whilst being not out.

New ball is due – not taken. I might have thrown it the other debutant, Vlaeminck, just for the craic. To our left on the the tellybox a lot of conversation about how disappointing England’s lack of ambition has been – as well as re- their inability to bat for more than a couple of  sessions. Get all that but would just note that some of those dissing the lack of dynamism were maybe not the most enterprising themselves when out there in the kit.

There are 11 Aussies glaring at Shrubsole from within about fifteen yards as she faces Molineux’s last delivery of the day. And it’s pret-ty similar as Gardner loops down the   ensuing and final over. Helmet and shin-pads are donned as yet another fielder hauls up ‘intimidatingly’ close. Dot ball. As anti-climaxes go, this was, erm, a worldie.

 

Day 2, Taunton. #WomensAshes.

Got soaked – and I do mean soaked – yomping through Bristol en route. But arriving in Taunton, having seen streaky trainscapes and mizzly skies, the outlook is better. To the extent that as I walk in the ground, the outer covers are being removed.

Ten minutes later, Mark Robinson is on his knees pummelling the strip, whilst talking to his skipper. An 11 o’clock start – inconceivable as I trudged towards Temple Meads – is possible.

Tammy Beaumont is directly in front of us, doing some fielding drills. Not hiding that thumb (the one that was x-rayed) following an issue at short-leg, yesterday. She could be so-o important, when England bat.

10.50 and the remainder of the wicket covers are wheeled off. To be honest we aren’t clear (us meedya daarlinks) if they are going for an 11 a.m. start but clearly that is possible.

Yup. Fairly remarkably, we are going to start (after an interminable ‘Jerusalem’), on time. Nobody is here.

Haynes slashes one through about third slip, off Shrubsole, who starts from the River End. (There is no third slip). Brunt will follow from the Pavilion: some swing available. Weather is such that a batting collapse – or two – is thinkable.

Nobody’s told Perry. She is up on her toes and just easing Shrubsole through extra. Fine shot for four. Decent comeback from the England seamer, mind: beats the outside edge with one that holds its line. 274 for 3 after 103 overs. Perry has 89, Perry 58.

Early signs are that Australia are negotiating what should be their spell of maximum difficulty. Which means more bother for England. Not much wrong with what Brunt and Shrubsole are doing… but it’s not stirring either Perry or Haynes, to be honest.

First change is Nat Sciver, from the River. Feels like she owes us a performance: significant talent, arguably under-achieving a tad? The lights are on. Perry drives Sciver very straight and goes to 95.

Some encouragement for Sciver as she gets some lovely, late-ish swing to draw a swing and a miss. Beautiful ball – no joy. Ecclestone will follow Sciver: lights are on but there is (I kid you not) some Proper Bright Sky around now. Alongside those clouds.

Oof. Ecclestone drops a gift, from Haynes. A mis-hit pull to square leg and the offie misjudges it really rather badly. She is developing really well as a bowler but I’m afraid – having seen her on numerous occasions now, live – she is consistently below-standard in the field.

Ecclestone will be hurt by that and it will hurt England. As a team, they have not been great, over the last day and a bit (or maybe over the series, so far?)

Ah. As if to emphasise the point, Perry gets to her hundred via an overthrow. Another genuinely Different Class-type of performance but in the perverse universe we all inhabit, it does now feel a bit like England are conspiring in their own downfall – ‘inviting’ those bad reviews. I’m going to steer clear of that stuff (for now) and just say that England have not been good, when they *really needed to be*.

Almost ludicrously, the day is brightish as Australia go beyond 300. At drinks at the end of the end of the 116th over, they are 301 for 3, with Perry on 102 and Haynes on 72.

Changes. Gordon then Laura Marsh will have a dash. Or rather an amble. (To be fair, no criticism implied: England’s energy is inevitably down a notch but nobody’s entirely going through the motions). Perry, attempting to sweep Marsh, gets both an edge and a wee boink on the helmet but the deflections don’t go to hand. England need about six flukes but no real dramas occurring. Dark clouds creeping towards us.

Possible run-out but Sciver’s throw is ordinary – as is the gather at the stumps. Was Perry scrambling; not a full-on chance, arguably but another mis-execution. That same batter then creams one from Marsh over mid-off. Stylish. *Statement*.

Gordon is persisting but it just seems the batters’ call as to what level of drama ensues. We’re beginning to see a lift in the general dynamism; surely won’t be long before we see a Proper Onslaught. Maybe straight after lunch?

Perry clubs Marsh away through midwicket for four. Moments later, again rolling those wrists a little, she picks out Heather Knight, who takes a sharpish catch, before throwing the ball up and away in relief – and maybe a little (self-directed) anger? Perry leaves us with 116 to her name. Mooney is in.

As we approach lunch and those aforementioned clouds come across us, my best guess is that we may escape rain. But I’ve not won a bet since I backed Red Rum, Spanish Steps and Money Market in the same National, so make of that what you will. 😉

Still a slip and a silly-mid-off as Marsh comes in to Haynes. The batter has made few errors; now she is punished, swishing across Marsh – she is l.b.w. and Australia are 335 for 5. Mini-opportunity for England, with two newish batters in and a short, possibly nervy period before lunch.

Belatedly, we get a review suggesting Haynes had been unfortunate. The ball hit her glove on the way through to the pad. Tough one for the ump to see but yet more ammo in the DRS debate.

Gordon’s 11 o’clock offies see us through, Mooney blocking watchfully. At lunch, Australia are 341 for 5 and despite those wickets, they are absolutely in command.

Good work from the guys from the Met Office. Predicted a spike in the likelihood of precipitation at 1.00p.m. Right on cue, it rains.

13.44. Still rain. Some sense that it may be brightening: therefore my next ridicu-bet is we re-start around 3pm. What can England hope for? When everything points to the game and the Ashes being gone? Eek. The talk amongst the journo’s is mainly about a Widening Gulf – expect those headlines.

But playing for pride isn’t an entirely vacuous concept. England must do that and salvage a draw. They must not capitulate, when the time comes to bat. The bigger issues around selection, preparation, the women’s game generally will and should be debated soonish – after the further inquest that will follow this match. Right now they have to bloody-well dig in, sharpen their senses, take that deep, deep breath and re-grasp the challenge.

In a nutshell, Australia are better (but) England obviously are not doing themselves justice.

14.29 and things are billowing. Tarpaulinacious things – covers. Because The Lads are hoisting and removing them. Jee-sus, my 3pm could be in with a shout! Hold the front page!!

Okaay. Just drifted past… and there is the lightest touch of rain. And despite England’s vigorous warming-up a medium-real threat of more, soonish, I fear. 15.10pm.

15.12 – covers going back on. Significant delay now looking likely.

Zummerzet Media Man, Spencer, telling us tea being taken now with a view to a 4pm re-start. 17 overs lost if we do get going again at that time – seems plausible.

Ah. Bit more rain, then…

Interestingly, plenty Aussies out in the elements; two doing timed interval running. Are they trying to intimidate us? Whilst we eat cake and stuff?

16.10 and it’s unknowable but increasingly unlikely, I think that they’re going to get back out there. Quantocks are shovelling dank grey slabs of air up and at us. Forecast has twitched further into the Sorry Mate But Dodgy Zone. Which leaves us where?

With less time in the game. With less chance for a glorious England recovery(!) and plainly increased inclination towards a brief boomathon from any returning Aussie batters, followed by extremely testing times for Beaumont, Jones et al.

Shame if the weather actually does puts the kai-bosh on possibilities like this: would have been good to see Australia charge from about 3pm this afternoon, then declare on 480 and look to bowl England out twice, pronto. (The vibe around the game suggests that this scenario would have been more likely than a noble and gritty rearguard action: England seem vulnerable rather than yaknow – defiant).

16.26pm. Now it’s siling down. No word yet but prospects of a resumption rapidly reducing to nil. I, meanwhile, am contemplating another sodden yomp.

Just realised I’ve said ver-ry little about Ellyse Perry. This is partly because she is the story YET AGAIN. And therefore it’s hard to say anything new, or insightful, or worthy of your time. But I’ll say this; Perry is extraordinary; fluent in 46 of the 46 cricket languages. Fluent in the other 678 sporting tongues, too. Moves, concentrates, reacts, flows like a goddess. Is, surely, a goddess? It is absolutely our privilege to be watching.

#WomensAshes. Taunton.

So a walk through Bristol is my warm-up. Fifty minutes, Ashley Down to Temple Meads. Past those hillside allotments, through those muggy, mural-tastic streets, past the Extinction Rebellion Posse. Then the train.

Taunton is also muggy, with cloud but the possibility of brightness… and bugger me, England and Australia are warming up, too!

In between presentations. New caps for Jones and Gordon, of Ingerland (Scotland) and Vlaeminck, Molineux and Gardener for Australia.

Have mixed feelings about the 86 people filming and posting these presentations – the transition into a Public Event. Like the idea of a deep, rich, private moment for these players to enjoy: not the same if The Presenter has to rehearse the bloody thing for six hours, knowing half the universe is going to give them marks out of ten. Miserablist? Maybe.

Aus win the toss and choose to bat. This because the expectation is that the strip – used some weeks ago in #CWC19 – is part-worn and likely to prove testing in the fourth knock. However, it does feel like England have an opportunity to make inroads this morning; weather feels designed to accommodate Shrubsole.

Brunt opens. Bouncy job, first up – comes through above the hip. Honestly great, sitting here, to see these women in their whites, *actually doing* the Test Cricket thing. Maiden over.

Healy gets the first runs off the bat. Drive through mid-off. Some encouragement – i.e. some swing, some bounce for both Brunt and Shrubsole – as England look to make a dent in the Aus higher order. They need to, you suspect. Australia are 6 for 0 off 4.

Brunt bowls a genuine bouncer, which Healy hooks in front of square for four. Not absolutely smashed but bold shot, nevertheless. Shrubsole beats her outside edge twice, consecutively, before over-pitching in search of that swing. Healy drives her through extra for another four. 19 for 0 after 6.

If Australian see out the first hour I foresee real trouble, for England, here.

Aha. Slightly from nowhere, Brunt castles Bolton. Peach. Ver-ry full; it’s length rather than any fireworks in the air or off the pitch that do for the left-hander. Great ball.

Healy looking a million dollars. Lanning has joined her. England have a field set for Healy to drill out towards point: she keeps doing it but piercing that cordon. 33 for 1 after 8. Predict 158 for Healy, this knock. (*Fatal*).

It’s not a summer’s day, in Taunton. Which might support what Shrubsole is trying to do. But actually, she’s not hugely troubling, for either batter, just now.

Big Moment as Ecclestone comes in for the 12th. First ball turns and beats the outside edge. Healy negotiates the over.

Lanning is watchful – 0 off 13 balls – but then glides Brunt beautifully behind point to get off the mark. Four. Middled. Sweet.

Ecclestone dives after a near-chance. Can’t quite get there. Personal suspicion is that Wyatt (for example) *might have*.

Game continues and Australia proceed to 60 for 1. Sadly, Ecclestone retreats from the pitch at this point – mid-over. Huge shame for her as she looks upset… and in pain as she departs. Huge for Kirstie Gordon, who may be one of very few debutants to enter Test Cricket to complete somebody else’s over.

Healy gets to a stunningly good 50, dispatching a poorish full-toss from Gordon. Eleven fours.

Later in the over the left-arm finger-spinner gifts her a shocker of a ‘beamer’ which she also carts to the horizon. Bit worrying for the bowler… and for England. Predict 500 and-odd, for the visitors and another potential massacre, *if England aren’t ver-ry careful, now*.

Hah. The Perverse Universe. Immediately after that shocker of a prediction, Gordon bowls the two best balls of the day, to Lanning, absolutely bewildering the outside edge. No joy but immense comeback from the bowler.

Welcome news. Ecclestone is back on the park.

Gordon is still serving up a rather mixed bag. Some killer-balls but full-tosses, too. And when she tries to vary the flight from that fullish, loopyish staple, Lanning clatters the shorter, flatter one to the cover boundary. Marsh will come in to bowl the 25th over, with Australia cruising, pretty much, on 80-something for 1.

Wow. Healy just misses one, on leg stump, from Gordon. Momentary lapse and gone. She was trying to swat it away behind square: ball did very little. First Test Wicket for the Scottish spinner and Australia are 91 for 2. Enter the magnificent Perry. Farewell to my predictions – you know I didn’t *actually mean them*, right? Healy made 58 (not 158).

Aargh. Knight drops a medium-simple catch after Lanning  prods, rather, to short extra. Could be huge; the captain will rightly be furious with herself. The skies are opening up and Perry and Lanning might punish England. 100 comes up in Marsh’s over – the 28th.

From the other end, Gordon again offers a biggish full-toss. Lanning says “cheers, mate” and it’s four more. 106 for 2 at lunch. Perry has 10, Lanning has 27. I will have that lasagne, please.

Brunt will re-open proceedings. Followed by Ecclestone, which is a relief, after what looked to be an upsetting injury earlier. No drama though, yet.

Brunt is bowling with intent; short, short, sometimes. Ecclestone, mercifully, seems to be bowling with decent flow, suggesting she’s not suffering too much.

Spin twins. Ecclestone from the Pavilion, Gordon from the River End. Ball turning a touch, slowly, rather than really ragging. Have wondered aloud if Gardener, for Australia, might turn it more than anyone – thereby uncoupling the alleged advantage to Ingerland. Fielders round the bat, for Perry, just now.

Bit concerned for the safety of those close fielders, to be honest. Gordon, whilst bowling some good stuff, has also served up some slightly scary full-tosses. Beaumont, at short-leg, may need to stay vigilant. 136 for 2, after 43.

Longish, quietish spell in which Gordon and Ecclestone keep a lid on Aussie progress. But in the 50th over, the Southern Stars do get to 150… & Lanning goes to her personal 50. She’s been goodish rather than sparkling but simply enduring is powerful enough, for now. Drinks.

Marsh is next up, from the River End, inevitably. 😉 Starts with a pearler but then offers a gift down leg – four.  Charlotte Edwards on comms wondering where Shrubsole is. Decent point.

It’s maybe not ‘suddenly’ but suddenly Lanning is gone – bowled Ecclestone. Fabulous, flighted ball which carried on straight; Lanning skittled, retreating, the ball somehow beneath the swishing bat. Both a good delivery and an error, you might say. 57 for the outgoing batter: in comes Haynes, at 160 for 3.

Oof. Another near-ouch as Ecclestone drops one in and Beaumont nearly gets decapitated by Haynes. Four through midwicket. Generous cloud, now, but the horizon is bright: decent breeze will blow these tufts away soon enough.

Apropos naff all, it feels, in the context of a lot of background noise, like the match needs scores of 300 plus, to ‘legitimise’ Women’s Tests. As we enter the 60th over with the returning Shrubsole, the visitors appear to be headed for that target… or beyond… particularly if these two persist. 180 for 3 as Shrubsole hands over to Marsh.

Marsh offers a legside ball then a wide one – both boundary balls, for Haynes, who goes to 21 off 27.

When Gordon follows Marsh at that River End, she starts with another full-toss, which Perry ushers with some ease to the mid-off rope. Frustrating. Shortly after, Perry goes to another 50, untroubled. Australia 200 up, for 3 down. At tea, that becomes 203 for 3, with Perry on 51 and Haynes on 26.

The left-handed bat is dancing down, to Gordon and booming her for four. Notable in that it’s the first time that we might attribute the word ‘lusty’ or maybe ‘violent’ to the act of batting.

Healy played through, rather than clubbed or boomed, I reckon. Lanning and Perry have been relatively circumspect. That, from Haynes was a wallop.

After 73 overs, Australia have 212 for 3. With that, we are informed that today’s attendance is 2,040. For Somerset, I think that’s a significant disappointment.

Elwiss will bowl the 76th – her first. She comes around, to Haynes, with her medium-pacers. She is straight, trying for little leg-cutters, I think – and bowls a maiden.

An observation. I know these bowlers know what they’re doing but I’m wondering if two or three of them might try getting in closer to the sticks. Marsh and now Elwiss bowling from markedly wide positions. Understand they will have their reasons/preferences/plans but clearly you have to shift the ball less from a straighter delivery position to inconvenience the batter. Generally.

81st over and Shrubsole takes the new ball from the Pavilion End. Needs to make something happen. Lovely to see that cherry gleam in the sunshine… but no obvious encouragement for the England seamer, other than a tad more bounce, perhaps. 228 for 3.

Brunt has made a couple of errors in the field. Hope this has made her angry. She’s in, now. First impressions? Didn’t come through with any pace.

Apropos bugger all, (revisited), I’m sitting next to Selina Steele, from (Aus) News Corps, Izzie Westbury and Adam Collins. Know Adam *reasonably well* but only just met the two women today. Said hello to Geoff Lemon earlier. Slightly bigger media representation here than on my previous visits: that Test Thing, I suppose.

At drinks, on 86 overs, Australian are 238 for 3. There is the sense that Shrubsole is labouring a little. As are England. The visitors look well capable of seeing the day out.

Given the weather for the next day or two, things are not looking that hopeful for a strong and sustained response from Knight and co. (Hunch being that Beaumont might conceivably get a big lump of runs if the weather stayed fine but a) it won’t so b) the fear is England may get battered if they have to bat through challenging, showery conditions. Bit pessimistic but – yaknow – *recent experiences*. Plus right now a dynamic bit of fielding and/or a cockup from the batters feels implausible. This is drifting.

Ah. In addition to the doom-mongering above, hearing Beaumont has gone for an x-ray following an injury to her left thumb. Honestly, seeing her field at short-leg for hour after hour today, she’s gotten off fairly lightly.

Could be really huge, that, in terms of England’s reply. Beaumont is a fine player, she’s tough and you would have to have her playing a key role if England were to go well, here. But batting with a sore thumb… ain’t good.

95 overs. Haynes gets to 50. Australia have 259 for 3. They are bossing it. Tomorrow’s weather may yet precipitate a batting collapse (geddit?) but clearly it may also usher a second batting horror-show over the ensuing hours.

England are in some trouble. It’s also true that their ground-fielding has been average – so on most counts, they are behind. The 100 partnership between Perry and Haynes comes up.

100 overs done. 6 p.m. prompt. Australia 265 for 3, with Perry on 84 and Haynes on 54.

Unquestionably Australia’s day but with disruption likely (and therefore implosions possible) who knows what that actually means? The thinking may be that England are up against it – that their batting may be simply unable to resist an Aussie attack buoyed by a worn pitch and muggy, streaky skies. But who knows? Besides, more pertinent than any theories about whether England can hang on in there are the questions around how they might win this; for win it they must.

It’s not the Ashes (it’s a whole lot more serious than that). Maybe?

7.45 am. You – we, I – check the weather. For Edgbaston. Even though we’re not actually going (unfortunately), just because you have to, because it’s Oz… and a semi.

Met Office inconclusive; because Ingerland, because 20/30/40% chance of showers at various times.

Expectations? Mixed, in a stomach-churntastic kindofaway, again partly because this is Oz and that is especially spicy but also because us England and Wales fans know that our lot really have been outstanding for a period of time. And maybe we hold onto to those delusions about brilliance deserving reward, laughable though that is.

*Walks dog*. Begins to dwell on the Real Life Things which may inconvenience the ideal, seamless scorch-to-glory for Our Eoin and co – or rather my viewing of said phenomenon. Walk back, in truth, more than a tad concerned that I may MISS THE BLOO-DEE DENOUEMENT on account of the Cricket-in-the-Castles event I now have to attend, later! Cue additional stomach-churn…

Let’s start with a boldish one: I reckon most neutrals would have England down as a marginally better side. Better quality – ‘deeper’. However I also think it likely that most neutrals might have Australia as favourites because a) they just find a bladdy waay, mate b) Starc/Warner/maybe Finch, maybe Smith. They have worldies who seem like they just won’t fail; like they just won’t fail against England; today. 

Could be that Starc isn’t even Australia’s best bowler but he may be the one to grab hold of this thing, irresistibly. You could see him ripping out England’s Finest, especially if the conditions favour early swing – maybe if they don’t.

Starc is fearsome. I don’t personally buy his occasional slightly tawdry tough-man thing but he is fearsome and it feels like he loves the limelight, relishes and grows into the killer moment; owns it.

(Incidentally, this morning my Australian Cricket Family(!) email me some ‘semi-final prep’ which includes an interview with Starc, on his ‘Toughest Opponents’. He names AB, Steve Smith and Ricky Ponting and Virat Kohli. No brits, two Aussies. Co-incidence?)

*OK, porridge. And some down-time. In danger of peaking too early, here…*

TMS. Bayliss’s blandishments. Dull: Farbrace joking afterwards about his ‘calm’. All figures but does his extraordinary non-animation work? 

Generally, you’d have to say the white-ball culture and results are – to use that cruelly over-used word – ‘positive’. Credit the man, too, for removing any Bayliss ego from the whole coaching process: that takes some doing and it’s healthy. Whatever the broader achievements, Bayliss will know that it’s the next few days that will inevitably define him. So no pressure.

Cricket. Aus win the toss and choose to bat first. Obviously this means England will be working pret-ty heavily against the grain of the tournament.

Anthems. Awful – both. Can we not be proud of our families, friends, communities, countries without all that? Or am I just wondering because those two anthems are so duff?

Swift thought intrudes. What a stage for Joffre Archer, what an opportunity for him!

For all of them, of course: Woakes, first up. Warner drives him for four. Woakes – on his home ground, remember – settles, thereafter. Nothing else, for Warner, in the over: nothing much happening in the air, mind.

Archer bowls full and straight at Finch. HUGE LB SHOUT!! OUT!! G.D. for Finch.

This brings in Smith. Archer peppers him then draws an inside edge. Fabulous tension around; Smith and Warner in, together, with England (well, most of Edgbaston) roaring. Great, great sport. 6 for 1 at the end of the over.

Woakes bowling those disciplined lines but Warner clouts him defiantly for four. Woakes’s response is a pearler. Quicker, bouncier – Warner can only fend to slip! 10 for 2.

Huge appeal against Handscomb, first ball. Erasmus says not out… and the review stays with that umpire’s call. Wow. Such is the rawness of the excitement, half the crowd think there’s a dropped catch at point next up; in fact Handscomb has drilled the ball into the turf. Breathless, intimidating stuff and a huge, intimidating start, from England.

Archer is loving it. He is both hostile and beautifully calm – and quick. Just the one run from his second over.

Woakes in again and appealing again. Nothing given and they opt not to review;correctly, as there was an inside edge. These are tough times for the two batsmen. Movement off the pitch, some bounce and a whole lot of braying brits.

Early days – maybe too early to be thinking about how Starc and co might be on this pitch – but England could hardly have wished for anything better from a) their start b) the bowling. Both Woakes and Archer have absolutely risen to this. Handscomb absolutely guessing against Archer. 14 for 2 after 6.

He may be guessing against Archer but now he is comprehensively bowled, by Woakes. Beauty, alright but the fella looked scrambled. (Personal view but I’ve never rated him; looks really unconvincing so-o often). Aus 3 down for bugger all. Carey is in, already. Carey. Moments later and Smith is 2, off 19 balls.

Archer bounces Carey. Rather scarily, his helmet is buffeted off in the collision and he catches it. Funeee-but-scareee. The guy needs a little attention: checking the replays, he does incredibly well to catch that helmet; which may have been rolling wicketward.

Resuming, Woakes, in the ninth, is teasing Carey, slanting across and leaving him. Eventually, the batsman *actually hits one*, driving through the covers for four. But there is substantial lateral movement, now, for England’s opening bowler. How long will Morgan keep him at it?

Archer is in again for the tenth. Double-change, after this, or persist and try to crack this innings wide, wide open? Boldly, after another testing over from Archer, Morgan opts to stay with Woakes. The relative thin-ness of that Australian batting order clearly in his mind. 28 for 3 after 11.

Stokes, however, will follow at ‘Archer’s End’. Big Moment, you feel, in the game and for Ben Stokes the international bowler. He is also finding some bounce. Good over – just the one from it.

Now Wood, from the Birmingham End. He gets a ludicrous amount of swing, first up – wide. Going across Carey, with width, he beats him. Then a further wide, marginally down leg. Then one on leg stump, clipped fine, drawing an incredible stop at the boundary, by Woakes, followed by a fabulous parry by Stokes, at backward point. Proper contests all-round, here. Weird, mixed over from Wood, mind. Three wides, coupla pearlers.

Just that sense that the game is quietening, as Smith and Carey find a little comfort. (Although the latter may well be in some discomfort, following that blow to the head. He has strapping supporting that jaw, now: brave fella).

Morgan is a philosophical geezer but he will want to drive the advantage forward rather than just contain, you suspect. Imagine him silently cursing as Stokes and Wood make no further inroads. 47 for 3 after 15 and here comes Plunkett.

Smith drives him straight for four. Without being remotely dominant, it does seem like the Aussie Genius is bedding in. Wood returns and Smith slashes him to the boundary. Momentum change – a gentle one, admittedly but the visitors are re-building. Smith is ‘picking off’ Plunkett, rather. 66 for 3 after 18.

Rain is possible today but hard to predict. There is a reserve day – tomorrow – but let’s hope that DLS/weather issues just aren’t a factor. The Aus runrate is inevitably currently lowish (below 4) due to that spectacularly challenging start but who knows how Roy, Root and Bairstow may go?

Rashid is in… and Carey seems onto him, playing with growing confidence, now.

Plunkett follows… and now we are into a containment phase. Good over. Rashid will need to back that up. Minor errors in the field don’t help that suspicion that England are struggling to maintain their intensity and focus. Morgan might want a word. 87 for 3 after 22. More Plunkett.

On TMS, the excellent Farbrace noting that Carey has looked the pick of the Australian batsmen. Agree – and the bloke may have a broken jaw (which he may have to ‘keep with). Top effort.

Aus reach their 100 with no significant dramas, in the 25th over. So what might they post? 260? Weird how conditions seem so benign, suddenly. For all the flak about #CWC19 pitches it seems we are likely to get another fascinating test of skills, here. Hope so.

Rashid is getting a little turn but Carey again picks his googly and sweeps hard for four. If Smith and Carey’s concentration and patience can last, you wouldn’t rule out a genuinely BIG partnership. Their 100 hundred partnership comes up.

*Real World Interlude* . Walk the beloved pooch. Come back.

Rashid, finding his flow, his arc, his confidence, by the looks, has taken two wickets. Carey gone. Stoinis gone. 130 for 5 after 30. And Archer is back, as England look to mop this up.

Stoinis was lbw and Carey (maybe predictably?) was caught in the deep, by Vince, the sub fielder. So are we looking at Aus around 260… or all out nearer 200? Game poised.

Maxwell strikes Rashid straightish for six. Great question, though from Nasser on Sky comms. “Can he play the innings of the day, as opposed to just the shot of the day?”

150 up. Rashid still whirling away, asking those proverbial questions pointedly enough but when short clubbed away by Maxwell.

Archer draws a streaky edge from Smith… and smiles, broadly. He goes to the bouncer – too short. Huge moment as Maxwell mistimes him to cover; the ball may have stuck somewhat in the pitch, lobbing gently to a grateful Morgan. Six down. Cummins in. 157 on the board.

What a privilege, really for England to be able to field a Rashid/Archer combo. How lucky they are. As we enter the last 15 overs, neither are in completely unplayable mode… but both are throwing down some beauties and the range of questions being asked is extraordinary.

Archer has Cummins – who is no mug – befuddled. Slower balls/knuckle balls. Tough to read.

Rashid, meanwhile is into his last over. He ‘gets’ Smith with a ground-catch. Then he has Cummins (caught behind, brilliantly, by Root), before bewildering the incoming Starc for no reward.  Finishes with 3 for 54, does Rashid: got better as he went on, playing a crucial part in getting England to a situation where 200 all out is on. As did Archer, who finishes with 2 for 32. Chapeau.

Wood will bowl the 40th. He’s cranking it up and mixing it up: some at 90mph. Four from the over 175 for 7. Aus would settle for 230 or 40 now, alright. Then Plunkett: tidy. Just the one single.

Australia – and we don’t say this too often – look like they daren’t be aggressive. It’s all about nurdles and nudges, Smith and Starc intent on persisting and racing those singles. There may be no ‘charge’ because it would be sinful in the extreme not to use almost (if not every) available ball. Score predictor is saying 222 but they will be wanting 240.

186 for 7 after 43 and Wood continues, around the wicket to Starc. Second ball driven sweetly past mid-off’s left hand – a rare four. Wood responds with a great, quick bouncer. Infuriatingly, he follows that with another legside wide – typical of his day, which has been disappointing.

Plunkett has been rather similar. He concedes a six and a wide (for height) in the 45th. Sky comms: it seems questionable that Woakes hasn’t been in a little earlier. (He has four overs remaining). 14 from Plunkett’s over, relatively risk-free runs, too.

A touch belatedly then, Woakes, with Aus at 206 for 7. Smith plays the Ugliest Shot Ever across into leg, for one. Starc, now, is trying to hit. Misses, pretty much.

Appeal against Smith, last ball of the over. Reviewed. Highish. Stays with umpire’s call – not out.

Wood again. Good ball at Smith, inside-edged onto pad. Close. Some good work from Starc, in truth, and the partnership reaches 50 runs. And they have accelerated somewhat.

Wow. Stunning bit of work as Buttler collects then throws down the wicket at the bowler’s end, towards which Smith is scampering. He’s out.

Double-wow as Woakes, again finding that killer length, draws an edge from Starc. Buttler takes a regulation catch. Suddenly we have Behrendorff and Lyons facing and Aus are nine down.

And finally, some joy from Wood. He castles Behrendorff with a beauty of a yorker. Classic, uplifting finish for the locals. Australia all out for 223, with 7 balls left unused.

Surely a great start for England? Now over to Bairstow and Roy and Root – who are blessed with the knowledge that they can play no-risk cricket for 30 overs or more. (Like the first two actually will, though). That alone must make them favourites…and yet. And yet the whole history of sport.

The reply. (How nervous are we?)

Fascinating to see how well-behaved, as it were, Roy and Bairstow are. They surely just need to sit, play some Test-like Cricket and let the runs happen around that? Except this goes absolutely against everything Morgan’s been driving for four years. So we can’t know. The policy is rubbing crazily, deliciously against the reality.

Behrendorff opens then Roy is magnificently straight-batted against Starc and England are 6-0 after 2. Ditto Bairstow (who creamed one through the covers first ball) against Starc’s lesser-known partner. Two airshots from Bairstow and a maiden for the ‘other’ gangly left-arm quick.

Special, special hands from Roy as he lasers Starc out through extra-cover for four. Then the openers dart for two. Good mix of stout defence and skilled breaking-out so far, from England. Roy again drives Starc through extra-cover majestically and England are 16 for 0 after 4.

When Starc gives Bairstow a little width, the Yorkshireman clatters him to the point boundary – timed, powerful. Wow. Then Roy dismisses – and I do mean dismisses – Starc to backward square  with an absurdly sweet flick. Suddenly England 31 for 0 off 6. Danger already, for Australia. They opt for Cummins.

Four dot balls, including a good bouncer, not too high. Two from the over.

I’m wondering how Carey’s feeling? In pain, I would think? Fancy ‘keeping to Starc, with a raging headache? Behrendorff has switched ends, interestingly. Bairstow clips him for two to leg then drives past him – slightly aerially – straight for four. Almost a return catch. 40 for 0, now, after 8. England significantly ahead.

Astonshingly, Roy is almost making this look easy. (Know that’s *fatal*). He is rolling the ball wherever he wants. The fifty comes up, for no loss. Can Lyons change anything?

No. Not immediately. Because immediately, Roy smashes him for 6.

It’s going to sound provocative if I relate that England’s most profound challenge is not currently the Australian bowling…but the injury sustained to Bairstow’s groin(!) With the score having moved on to 71 for 0, the poor lad needs several minutes of (ahem) medium-personal massage. But he does resume.

The nature of what he does may be different, however. Bairstow, in his relative infirmity, may engage slog mode. He even does it to Starc – over mid-off. Roy does it, straight after, even better. We really are nearly entitled to use the word ‘romp’ here. Roy goes to 50 with another four and England are 95 for 0 at drinks. Remarkable stuff.

But there’s more. Smith thinks he’ll try and make something happen, so has ‘a little bowl’. Roy smites him for THREE CONSECUTIVE SIXES. As I walk out the door, Roy is 75 off 57 balls and England are 119 for 0.

Guess what. I’m not joking. I have to go. There’s a Cricket-in-the-Castles event, in Pembroke, I have to attend. And no, I didn’t schedule it. Back later with some gloating – I mean reflections…

I’ve been away five hours. I’ve been busy – I’ve *actually been* a star. (Fancy-dress stylee. Was ‘entertaining’ young children at the event and also being mugged by the little darlings –  mostly, amazingly, while their parents looked on). Let me grab a brew and try to make some sense of all this.

You will probably know by now that England have absolutely crushed Australia, by 8 eight wickets and that their excellence with the ball (generally) has been more than matched by their superlative batting, from Roy and Bairstow in particular. The captain and his trusty placer-and-deflector (Root) finished things off in fine style, after Roy found another level against Starc and Cummins. Australia were never in it.

Edgbaston, the place, the icon, the cauldron unquestionably played a part but the century-plus stand (again) from the opening bats decimated any hopes Australia might have had.

It was not just the runs but the how of those runs: Roy smiting and somehow flicking and carting all at the same time. Bairstow – after a watchful phase – was belligerent and brilliant as so often. Yes it was The Partnership, The Platform that made this happen but Poms will be dreaming mainly tonight about how Roy swung those deliveries away as if immune to the alleged pressures of the moment. It was utterly exceptional… and it was against Oz, and for the final.

I note, at 9.35pm, that there are highlights on Channel Four at 10pm. Maybe I’ll watch Roy’s cruel dismissal – clearly a travesty – and savour the cruise home after he and his fellow demi-god walked from the scene. Maybe I don’t need to. I saw enough and have heard enough now, to confirm this as one of the great days for British sport. Let’s hope that Sunday brings more of the same.

We can’t argue that this was a vindication for Morgan’s Way, for this batting performance once again spoke of utter fearlessness and the expression of dominance not patience. However Roy and Bairstow were sagacious enough to get themselves in before beginning to unpick, or indeed dismember the Australian attack. Once at ease on a track that only Smith and Carey amongst their opponents seemed able to read, their quality and that rare, rare confidence shone.

 

#WT20 – good & not so.

Unashamedly blasting this out. Amorphous wotnots and occasional insights, I hope. Reflections. Dangerously off-the-top-of… my barnet. ‘S fine, because nobody will read it – because it’s about The Wimmin.*

So GOOD – & less good – lumped together. Bit like the tournament; maybe *like any tournament?*

Memo to self- and to you, sagacious friends – don’t go comparing it to the blokes. It’s different.

  • Australia. Their surge towards completeness. Different level of preparation, intensity & often – quality.
  • Perry & Schutt didn’t blow people away but they were still imposing; as was the team. Clearly it was Healy’s tournament (except for that weirdly dysfunctional final, keeping-wise!) but it was the team, actually, that crushed the opposition.
  • Generally better fielding and more threatening bowling. Generally more dynamic batting – power play batting from a different universe to most teams. T20 cricket from a different, newer, more dangerous era.
  • ‘Course India beat them so arguably that’s cobblers… maybe. (But not for me). It wasn’t just during the final that Oz were mostly competing at a higher level.
  • Is it good, or bad, that Aus appear to be out-cooling and out-boshing all of us on the investment in the women’s game front? No argument. 1. Fair play and congratulations. 2. Might this lead to Grand Prix-like processions to victory? (The ECB may come under pressure if the ‘re-organisation’ of the women’s schedule here stalls the recent surge towards higher standards and greater depth).
  • But back to #WT20. England were mixed – from Aus-like in their cruising past poorish opposition – to periodically awful in the field.
  • On the one hand it’s absolutely right to note that the absence of their toughest competitor (Brunt) and a truly fine keeper and stylish bat (Taylor) would hurt any team. But as England are resourced and prepared in a way that probably only second to Australia, we’re entitled to judge them pret-ty keenly, yes?
  • Amy Jones. Did a goodish job behind the sticks (as good as most international keepers?) and pressed the I’m Here! it’s Me! button, whilst batting.
  • Jones looked technically strong and crucially more dynamic than most of her team-mates during the international season, without quite building that seminal knock. (She got 20-30s when I saw her live but oozed something authentic and encouraging). A good deal of that landed in the World Cup: a strong #WBBL could see her fully ‘emerged’.
  • Tactically, Mark Robinson and co were again strikingly bold – fielding a zillion spinners, insisting that Beaumont and Wyatt charge early. Only during the final did Wyatt get into the or her game, though, whilst Beaumont felt out of rhythm – was scratchy, when she needs to be timing the ball to generate runs around the place at a decent rate. (She is not as powerful as some other high-order players, obvs).
  • Of course the spin-fest was a reaction or an expectation around pitches – which were widely regarded as disappointing. I respect Robinson’s gutsy hunch but was it just me that thought somebody was gonna cut through the slow-bowling ‘stranglehold’ and see that actually none of the England spinners turned it very much… and only Ecclestone bowled with that searching pace… and therefore they were rather fortunate not to get carted? (Poor generalisation maybe but ‘twas how I felt).
  • The Scots import Gordon did well, mind. Not spectacular, not hugely threatening, but did well.
  • Sciver is plainly ‘our’ Perry. Athlete. She grows into the role, fair play. Did particularly well to fill the Brunt-shaped hole, first up. Infuriates me with her bat-swing, mind – so unnecessarily hoiktastic and across the line – but hey-ho, she’s well within her rights to go with something she’s comfortable with, I guess. It just smacks of somebody who finds it all rather easy, overthinking and clumping everything to leg. But she’s a star.
  • Shrubsole bowled again, at times, more skilfully and with more raw swing than anyone else on the planet. She is class. She is class but still looks if not hurt, then less mobile and agile than would be ideal.
  • The Fielding. We ain’t necessarily comparing them to the blokes when we say that the fielding was – in the tournament generally – not good enough. Appreciate standards are improving. Appreciate Wyatt, Sciver, Knight, Beaumont, a bunch of Australians and plenty other individuals look like athletes in the field and are consequently great to watch. But despite the upward curve on this, too many players are simply not looking like international-class athletes – and this is important.
  • It’s important not just in the way the game is received, broadly but also in how matches seem, live. Running, fielding, catching, throwing can be electrifyingly central to the drama. Currently, obviously, they are let-downs too often, undermining the spectacle, the theatre of all this.
  • I know that work is going on to improve fielding work everywhere and that increased professionalism will change this.
  • *Also*. I’m slightly fascinated to know whether Robinson’s reference to ‘tears’ has related to some fairly brutal laying down of expectation regarding fielding skills. He will know that only about four of five of his players are good enough, out there. Do wonder how England staff bundle that forward, what level of urgency they insist upon, what pressure is being applied?
  • Like Robinson, I think I’m looking to judge the players as international-class athletes rather than women. But we’re both men of a certain age… and maybe likely to mess that one up, here and there.
  • Hey but not going to finish on a negative. I’ve loved the ambience and the actual cricket during 2018 and (acksherly) I spend half my coaching life actively supporting girls into cricket. Tomorrow I’m coaching the next, female generation and bloody looking forward to it.
  • I hope they will see more (or more of) Kaurs or Scivers or Taylors or Perrys: that their lives will be enriched and excited by stars they come to look up to.

 

*Accept that some folks will read some or all of this as somewhere between dubious and misogynist. Can live with that.

I’ve enjoyed travelling and supporting women’s international cricket and know my *intentions* are sound. Do regard it as maybe the most excitingly, richly-developing sporting phenomenon on the planet, right now. Hope to be able to see England Women on several occasions next season.