#WomensAshes. *Decider?*

Shrubsole bowls short & wide second-up and is crunched for four by Healy. Then a big inswinger draws a big shout. Healy then drops and runs. We’re off.

We’re off in what may already be The Decider. A fielding error from Sciver gifts Healy a four but Cross and Shrubsole are looking hopeful: there is a little on offer, in the air. Cross’s line and length is impeccable. 9 for 0 after 2.

Healy, though – surely one of the best players in the world? – is unforgiving. When Cross does stray to leg stump, she is lofted over mid-wicket. But a full, straightish one almost catches the batter on her crease: big shout, not out.

Predictably, Bolton is playing second fiddle. But when Shrubsole goes very full, the left-hander drives beautifully straight for four: not that Shrubsole will mind that sense of her reaching forward too much.

21 for 0 after 6. On the one hand, Australia untroubled; on the other, both bowlers swinging that ball.

A burst of drama. Shrubsole, coming in for her fourth, has Bolton leg before. Questionable? Her next delivery swings alarmingly in at the incoming Lanning and the next is a peach – again, an inswinger par excellence. Could Shrubsole be back to her best, here? Wicket maiden.

Healy, superbly, breaks out with another commanding off-drive. Given the help the bowlers are getting this is impressive, from her, so far. It’s a good contest. Liking the outswing/inswing combo from Cross and Shrubsole, against Healy’s in-form punchiness and now the perennially outstanding Lanning.

Another irritating error in the deep, as Jones – a keeper, remember? – fumbles Healy’s boom to leg over the boundary. The Aus opener is well set, at 35. Time for Ecclestone to change this.

Commentary on SkySportsMix noting a dip in the quality of England’s intent, in the field. They may be right and it may be fatal: Healy could take this series away from England, now, you think – particularly with her skipper there to back her up.

Ecclestone bowls a good over but with no reward. The second change is Sciver. We are 53 for 1 after 12, with Healy on 41.

Ecclestone in again, flighty and fuller than she often bowls. Don’t mind that – first over was on the challenging side of good. However, Lanning takes it on, driving two successive boundaries through the covers. Australia doing that positivity thing *so well*, even under a little pressure.

Guessing Knight and Robinson have called for the bowlers to stay full, to believe, if there’s some help there. (There is, they are, but Australia are absolutely up to it). Impressive, from the visitors. 73 for 1 after 14.

Healy hammers a poor, short one from Ecclestone through square leg: it’s her 50 and it’s been brilliant. When Lanning dismisses Sciver to backward point and then square leg, the sense *really is* that Australia are storming away: dangerous times, for England.

Rightly, Knight looks to mix things up. Marsh is in. They (England) have to rob a wicket, you feel, as both batters are spookily in. It may be that Lanning miscues Marsh but  the boundary brings the 100, for just that one down.

Are Australia bringing their A Game, at the crucial moment? Does seem that way.

Clearly that sentence may not age well… but as Healy pummels another four (off a shocker of a half-tracker) English Anxieties are not so much creeping… as Edvard Munching. 117 for 1 with the Southern Stars really, really shining. Lanning now has 50, off 50 balls, Healy 62 off 61. Runrate is 5.5. Textbook.

From nowhere – although does it feel like this is what Healy does? – a wicket. The utterly dominant opener heaves Sciver’s short one to Wyatt in the legside deep. A gift, a disappointment for Healy but she knows there is quality to come. Perry strides in.

Wow. Lanning misjudges an innocuous short-pitched delivery from Sciver and is gone, off a leading edge, caught at short cover. Another streaky wicket for the England all-rounder but by jimminy, she’ll take it. Haynes is in, at 154 for 3.

Knight is bowling and it’s a bit mixed. Awful wide one down leg nearly has the batter falling over, so hard does Haynes swing.

From the other end, Sciver draws a very thin edge from Perry – snaffled, inevitably by Taylor at the stumps. Extraordinary turnaround. On a fabulous track, this is amazing – as is the mini-package of Perry dismissals on the telly. A legside stumping and two wide balls edged.

Australia are 165 for 4 after 30 overs. If we did that thing where we now double the possible number of runs… but no. With Healy and Lanning there, 330 might have been possible. Now it feels as though England might even bowl the Aussies out! The A Game I spoke of earlier is looking more C+ again.

Against the grain, Mooney swings Marsh high over mid-on. A further reminder that Australia will not be dictated to. Another small but not inconsequential error in the field as point dives over a cut from Haynes – Shrubsole hauls it in. Game feels in the balance again but England must be sharper in the field, to make good on this fightback.

A quiet period. Marsh and Sciver but I agree with Edwards (on TV) who is calling for Shrubsole. Maybe a tad conservative, from Knight, this.

Cross is back. She got some outswing earlier but was relatively expensive. With nothing in the air to help her, now, she still gets Mooney playing around a straight one – lbw. 188 for 5. Maybe now we’ll see Shrubsole from the other end?

Marsh will continue, to Haynes – who has been joined by Gardner.

Extraordinary-but-true. I go off to coach some juniors at this point and when I return – as I walk in the door – Fran Wilson is just being bowled and England are 40 for 7, in their reply. Australia have set a target of 270.

The Inquest (that began for many of us after the previous encounter, in Leicester) is well and truly on. In the car, on the radio, Westbury was shell-shocked, Rainford-Brent articulate as we all look for things to say that are both fair  without being overly insulting.

Shrubsole is bowled, by Perry, who now has 6 for 22, I think. England 45 for 8.

I haven’t at this point seen either the final few overs of the Aus innings or the catastrophic start to the reply from the hosts. Not sure now, if I want to.

This is extraordinary – and humiliating. If there is (and there always is) some fascination and some learning in this massacre, it may centre around the following;

  • there may not be a huge amount of difference in the quality of individuals between these two sides… but there is some.
  • Australia significantly underachieved in the first two ODI’s – despite winning them both.
  • Now that two or three of Australia’s world-class players have played up to their level – I’m thinking Healy, Lanning, Perry – England have been brutally exposed.
  • Specifically the fraught and overlapping areas around game plan, execution and mental toughness appear critical – cruelly so.

(Ecclestone goes, caught for 0).

  • It may be unhelpful, it may even be misguided to generalise about deeply internal things but it seems that (again) Australia have risen as the challenge becomes more pressured… and England (again?) have not.
  • The language around this will therefore become unfortunate, no doubt. Because disappointment, because anger and even resentment over apparent incompetence or unsuitability given a highish level of resources. England have ‘capitulated’; England have been ‘abysmal’; England have failed.

There will be questions – I asked some tough ones in my last blog. Robinson and Knight will be under the cosh, the ‘Loughborough Bubble’ will be much-discussed and other, more hurtful stuff about the resilience and desire of most of the individuals in the England side will be spiralling about. Inevitably.

Indisputably, Australia are better. They really are to be congratulated for their quality and their mindset. And maybe particularly the fact that they appear to be able execute on that mindset. Healy is brilliant but also bold; even when the team is stuttering, somebody *actually does* counter-attack.

In the field they are a notch up on England both with their bowling and ground work – generally. (Or they have been today – when it really mattered). And maybe they are more aggressive, ‘philosophically’ and in terms of strategy than Knight?

Heather Knight is trusty and accomplished; on times she is heroic in that particulary quiet, English way. But *there is an argument* that her schtick is possibly a touch banal; all that saying the right stuff, repeating the inoffensive half-truths about approach, motivation, execution. Now that the smalltalk has been trampled, she may lack the charisma to hoist her side back towards respectability, never mind competitiveness.

In the short-term, of course England have nowhere else to go. They cannot make wholesale changes; they will not, at this time, fire the skipper. This squad is ver-ry close to England’s best: somehow they have to find something – have to get real, have to dig in.

Because today Perry has murdered any pretence. (See, told you the language might lurch towards the unfortunate). In the void where England were supposed to be, that sense that Australia might show up soonish (and smash English pretensions) has rushed in, cruelly – magnificently.

Marsh is out, for a creditable 21, lbw but England are all out for 75. Ashes gone; not mathematically gone – much worse perhaps?