Highlights Reel, as does the memory. Universe Podcast looks back on a year of cricket – mine, 2019.

A meander through my personal highlights, with particular attention on the games I actually attended. Vaguely chronological but with the inevitable @cricketmanwales-stylee diversions.

So, unreliable memories around both England men and women’s international fixtures, plus KSL and Blast19 stuff. Some thoughts on coaching – on the England men’s batting – and ‘philosophical’ notions around approach and responsibility. Finally, I fall into a realisation that my ‘Day of the Year’ may have been…

well go listen and find out. And please do RT if you find it at all listenable.

 

*Note: plank that I am I started to say something about Sophie Ecclestone but then drifted. What I was going to add was that she is clearly a talent – already our (England’s) go to bowler when Knight needs to make something happen. (Not bad for a 19/20 yr-old). She isn’t a great fielder but one of my abiding memories of a difficult Women’s Ashes for England was that Ecclestone offers something.

Knighthood? / Hold My Beer.

Heather is a particular kind of name, is it not? Speaks of Englishness and church-going families and quiet, erudite children. Or is that just me? Best move on.

Heather Knight is English. In fact she’s the England Captain (did you know?) having attended Cardiff MCC University en route into the game. Now the England Captain in cricket – Women’s Cricket. And she just did something, something pret-ty phenomenal.

We’re in Hove – where else? The sun is shining and there’s a particular crowd; smallish but by no means insulting, keen but by no means raucous. It’s the #KSLFinalsDay.

Heather’s team, Western Storm, have just struggled to contain the opposition, Southern Vipers, as they post a challenging score in the season finale – the final, defining, ‘all-important’ shoot-out.

(Vipers have amassed a total of 172 runs off their 20 overs. This is a major bundle and would in most circumstances signal a cruise to victory. However there are *things*. Firstly Storm are a hugely robust outfit, in a really good way. Secondly, they did haul the game back towards themselves, late-on. Thirdly, they have Heather).

Knight is the captain, remember – and she Captains Ingerland. And Wales. This same England that was so utterly outclassed by the Australian tourists recently that the Ashes was not so much surrendered as gift-wrapped and übered across with a sweet card from Marks & Sparks, signed ‘Much love, Heather & the girls’.

The result of this rather painful and prolonged public humiliation was the Coach of Ingerland losing his job and the ECB shuffling out some bulletins to quell the mounting unrest over The Widening Gap between Us and Oz. We can only imagine that Heather Knight’s position was ‘discussed’ during this accountability review: she was, after all, more at the helm than the coach, you might argue.

Knight did no doubt endure some tough questions, as well some Dark Nights of the Soul. How could she not have a blub into the cushion, or squeeze the dog just a touch too hard, in melancholy distraction? England’s performances, as well as the system were brutally unpicked, perhaps most painfully – though justifiably – by former colleagues now in the media corps. In short it’s been a bloody tough few months, for Heather.

Except. Except she has had Western Storm.

Western Storm have smashed it. They won all nine of their first nine fixtures in the Kia Super League before losing in the last, rain-affected game, to Yorkshire Diamonds. They were durable and deep, as a squad. Having contacts in the camp, I am sensing that they were also a proper posse, with the kind of comradeship that only sometimes accompanies big-shot, international sporting coalitions. And of course they were led by Heather Knight.

Knight has just become the highest scorer in the Kia Super League – the only woman to pass the 1,000 runs mark. She has been absolutely central to the stonking Storm campaign, in 2019. In the final, yesterday, against Southern Vipers, she blasted and clipped and drove to 78 not out to claim a) the trophy and b) the Player of the Match award. But there is & was more.

The nature of Knight’s performance was somewhere between fine and phenomenal. After her side had scrambled, clawed at the air and generally under-achieved more than a little, in the field, she rose to it.

Set an intimidatingly steep total and after losing her Indian Superstar of a bat, Mandhana, to a nervy pat to mid-on, first ball, Knight marched briskly in, early. Must have been scary: must have *asked questions*. Pah. I soon noted (in my epic blog, one post back, free-to-air!) that Knight ‘looks goodish’.

Starting (or re-starting) with Priest, she knows she must get after the bowling from the outset, such is the required run-rate. Priest, without ever looking classically smooth is going well – dispatching Wyatt, in particular, with some intent. But Wellington, the young Australian leg-spinner removes Knight’s partner with a peach that loops, turns and enables the stumping.

I remember clearly noting that despite the gathering pressure, Knight swept Wellington immaculately for four, immediately post that potentially key dismissal. Wilson then joined her and joined in with the essential urgency, making a timely 18 before holing out to Wyatt in the deep. Luff cannot sustain the momentum, though and goes, off the glove, bringing in another ‘Overseas’, Deepti Sharma.

Sharma is a fine, international player who has been twiddling her bat for two months; barely required as Storm stormed. Now, she and her skipper have proper work to do.

I thought for two or three overs that Sharma looked out of nick. But she, alongside her increasingly imperious, captain, accumulated runs. They had to. Quickly.

Knight got to fifty. She played what I described as the shot of the day, cracking an absurdly sweet cover drive to the boundary. She was absolutely on it, finding that almost dreamlike focus, staying in there, quietly relentless.

From the blog:

You feel that if Knight stays there, Storm get this. And I reckon she knows that.

Knight hit three towering, lusty,

boomtastic sixes on the way to 78 not out and to the trophy. There was or there became something of a Stokes-level of inspiration, of capture-of-destiny about the proceedings. (Knight doesn’t hit that many sixes – she’s ‘not that powerful’. But she found a way; reinvented herself; had no choice).

It was a Captain’s Knock… and then some. It was remarkable, in that it was initially shockingly unlikely and then in terms of its gathering brilliance. She defied. She clonked. She led.

I hope to god Knight actually loved it, in the moment. Because it soared, entertained and vindicated… and proofed her utterly against doubt and against The Doubters. And it’s hard to know what Heather is actually thinking: I hope there was scope for enjoyment – during as well as after.

It was, in a joyous and electrifying way, cricket and drama of the very finest variety. It scoffed at the very idea that Heather – the athlete, the champion, the leader – might be in any sense bland. How sensational that sport can do that? How gratifying that quality sometimes tells?

#KSLFinalsDay. The final final.

An adventure, as always loaded up with expectation, adrenalin, hope, memory. To unfamiliar but not entirely unknown Sussex. To the place where bruv number 2 did some college, where we stalked past a bombed hotel(!) – where we partied.

But that really was long ago. So who knew Brighton had hills? I remember the Grand Regency Architecture Thing but not the hills. I remember shingle. And no question of cricket.

The now is different. I’m here because I follow women’s cricket some, because there’s Welsh interest, because I got accreditation. I’m expecting an event but with that gentler thrum; with its own authentic, romantic force and quality.

On the long train-ride in I’m picturing a win for Western Storm and want that, in a non-partisan kindofaway. But there is space in the daydream for some brilliance from Wyatt, Beaumont and somebody less familiar. I’m really hoping to learn something.

The whole thing’s a huge indulgence – a bloggist’s folly. It’s for me and for registering a tiny voice.

I hope too, that it makes explicit something of the value of the women’s game. Here’s how Sunday in Hove went…

First thoughts? Wow. What a day. Hove has kicked back into summery stuff, after last evening’s autumnal grey. The ground is looking low and somehow both open for light but also cwtched rather romantically into the groovicious near-seafront. For Hove, for Brighton, make no mistake, is pret-ty groovy.

Yesterday, having walked into the 1st Central County Ground for the first time, I tweeted two, instinctive words. Autumn… and Shrubsole. Because it was autumn yesterday and because I imagined Our Anya swinging it about three foot two. Even the white thing. Today is very different. Today is absolutely beautiful.

11 am. A further wander round confirms it really is sickeningly pleasant – and ideal for the athletes. Sure the Vipers & Lightning Posses are ‘warming up’ but this may be as much about culture as necessity. Wyatt and Beaumont and the rest are surely expelling nerves as much as *actually preparing*, which could be done in about two minutes flat, I reckon, today. (O-kaaay. I know this isn’t entirely true. But you get my drift, yes?)

So sun. Sun and a light breeze. And a straw-coloured deck and boundaries in and summery toons from those ubiquitous, faintly sinister black speakers. Cricket weather to the beatific max.

But predictions? Storm are outstanding and also durable, somehow. Lightning are absolutely flying – six wins on the bounce. Vipers have Beaumont, Bates and Wyatt. So how, in a 20 over format, are we reasonably going to predict anything?

Storm should be advantaged in that they sit out the first game – the ‘semi’. All the Stormtroopers power and energy can therefore be focussed on that single, final effort. (I think this may tell. This and the fact that I suspect they have marginally the strongest squad).

I break off briefly to guffaw at the Vipers S & C Coach (I think) who joins in the end of a movement drill to throw hopelessly and wusstastically at a single stump. And I really do mean wusstastically).

…Then I break off into Proper Cricket, if I may?

Elwiss has won the toss for Lightning and has chosen to bat: Daggers on comms describing it as a ‘good-looking strip’, or similar. So in half an hour Vipers will bowl at Loughborough Lightning and the #KSLFinalsDay will be underway.

A further distraction before we return to those non-predictions. Charlotte Edwards – Lottie to most – is looking cool and authoritative in her Vipers clobber, as she belts some forward drives at rotating catchers. Demanding stuff, with few catches taken because of the sharpness of the striking. Closing out with respectful rather than pally high- fives. Could she be the next England Coach? Clearly she’s a front-runner.

But predictions. I predict any of these three teams could win this. Because talent everywhere and because the nature of T20 cricket. Wyatt could win this on her own; as could Knight, Priest, Shrubsole, Jones, Atapattu etc etc (pick your own).

I am expecting key contributions from those named whilst *looking out for something fabulous* from Smriti Mandhana with the bat, Wilson in the field, Lauren Bell with the ball. Plus did I mention Tammy Beaumont, yet? If not, let’s note to the universe that she has the talent and the mentality to go big on a Big Stage. Flipping through the programme, I’m going for Storm, because they feel deeper.

11.50 and the sun really does break through again, after twenty minutes of moodier climes. I’m really ready to enjoy this: as always, wish there slightly more here to appreciate. Minor grump: as so often the mood music (😂) and announcements are shockingly, embarrassingly, unnecessarily too loud. Hang the DJ.

Tash Farrant will open, for Vipers, Atapattu to face.

We’re not behind the bowler’s arm, in the Media Centre so difficult to see how much shape there was from Farrant – suspect some. But no real threat. Eight come from the over including a full-toss, last ball, dispatched straight for four.

From the Cromwell Road End, excitingly, it’s Lauren Bell. Bell is strikingly tall and slim – and eighteen years of age. And notably quicker than Farrant. She beats the openers twice, with pace and a touch more bounce, conceding just the four runs in the over. Good start.

Farrant, returning, goes full but is smartly driven for four, by Jones. There is generous applause for some neat outfielding from Bell – the crowd is building, encouragingly. We are 20 for 0 after 3. Little bit of swing available from both ends, track looking benign and maybe slowish.

Bell, whose run-up features something of a deceleration pre- gather, it seems, is looking committed. But she bowls a second wide – this time down leg. Jones, though, offers a gift, stepping out wide looking to invent something over fine leg. Daft and unnecessary and out, bowled.

Wyatt will bowl the 4th, with Adams joining Atapattu. Good energy, as always from the England dasher, who is looking to tweak it for Atapattu’s edge. 23 for 1 at the end of her over.

Bell returns for her third and gets Atapattu in front. Lovely, full delivery which swings just enough – late. Big moment? Enter the skipper Elwiss.

Unfortunately the young quick messes up the rest of the over. Two no-balls followed by a wide. Cue the mutterings about not winning anything with kids. 33 for 2 as the powerplay ends.

Wellington, who is watchable; big-turning leggies possible. Adams rather lamely lifts the second one out through cover… but safely. Then she paddles one fine for four. Turn, though. 39 for 2.

Off-spin, from the other end, with Morris.  Just as I am about to note the complete absence of power-hitting so far, Elwiss clouts her straightish for four.

Wellington in for more. Elwiss and Adams, experienced both, have upped the ante. Sharper running, heavier hitting. Elwiss again strikes hard for four, evading the diving Bell. 56 for 2 after 9 as Bates tries her medium-pacers from Cromwell Road. A wide to leg but overall a tidy start.

Elwiss greets the returning Wyatt with another aggressive blow for four before Adams carts her for the first six of the innings. Good spell this, for Lightning, after a slowish beginning. 76 for 2 after 11.

Farrant has changed ends and will be looking to re-apply some control. Better than that. A rash second run means Elwiss is short, and gone for a goodish 28. Lightning are 85 for 3 after 12. Game feels even.

Bates takes a cool catch at fine leg, to remove Adams, again for 28, Wellington the bowler. Importantly, there are now two new batters at the crease – Freeborn and du Preez. Excellent, competitive game brewing.

Bell will bowl her final over but starts with a wide outside off. Another wide one is eased for four. A third is (actually for the second time) smashed straight back at her; too brutally to offer a catch, you would say. Then another wide. Bell finishes with 2 for 23; decent, for sure but maybe not entirely reflecting how mixed her contribution was. She is a talent, and this is a big stage but there was some loose stuff in there.

Bates returns from in front of us and du Preez lifts her impressively for six, before smashing another one back at the bowler, again un-catchably. Freeborn joins in with a further pull for four, bringing us to 110 for 4 after 15. Good total now in sight.

Particularly as du Preez booms Morris for the third six of the innings – this one to square leg. Morris has her revenge, mind, as Wyatt takes a comfortable catch immediately after. Enter Gunn.

The first really poor bit of fielding as Kelly dives over one, allowing the boundary. Vipers have been generally pretty sharp out there. As if to emphasise this, Wyatt takes another catch in the deep with some style – Freeborn the victim. As we start the 18th, Lightning will be 127 for 6.

Manifestly poor calling and running sees Gardner run out for 0. Gunn maybe culpable there. The veteran cuffs one through square leg by way of apology. 133 for 7 with 2 overs remaining.

Beaumont (I’m afraid) looks to have slightly bottled a sharpish catch to mid-off. At the very least, she misjudged it. The Vipers captain is rightly angry, as will be her bowler, Farrant. Can Gunn and Glenn take their team to 150 and beyond? It feels *that kind of pitch*.

Maybe not. Morris takes a steepler to remove Glenn, off Bates. Then Wyatt again swallows another blow to deep midwicket – Higham gone. Bates promptly bowls Gordon, rather humiliatingly, to finish the action at 143 all out. Vipers are in it but seem 20 short; expecting a Proper Game, though.

Interestingly, Atapattu will open for the Lightning: Bates facing. Third ball is threaded beautifully through the covers for four. Wyatt takes a wild swing and is hugely fortunate to clip it over her own right shoulder for four: Atapattu not that impressed with the chase and dive at the boundary edge. Me neither.

Gunn will bowl the second. Wyatt picks her off to leg for four. There is a wide, to off and an ambitious slap over mid-on that brings six. Followed by another, more controlled, over extra. Wyatt has 18 off 6 and the Vipers are 29 for 0 off just 2 overs.

Lightning change; Glenn will bring her leg-spin to try and break the momentum. Decent over, conceding just the five runs.

Bates clatters one inelegantly through the hands of mid-on for four before clearing that same fielder more convincingly: Atapattu the bowler on both occasions. Vipers have raced to 45 for 0 off the first 4 overs. Slightly worryingly, this with Bates looking slightly out of touch, so far.

*Fatal*. The opener creams one over mid-on for a further boundary. 50 up. When Wyatt skilfully cuts to third man for four more, then the angst becomes palpable. 57 for 0 after 5, with Lightning unable to check the onslaught.

Gardner brings more pace but no relief, Bates pull-driving through mid-on. Then rather cruelly, Gunn’s lack of athleticism is highlighted as she drops a goodish chance over the boundary, to groans from the crowd. The opening six overs have brought 70 runs but 0 wickets. Wow.

What can Gordon do?

Bates whips her hard through midwicket for four. But the left-arm offie bowls her with a beauty to offer some hope. 76 for 1. Beaumont mistimes her first ball but escapes with a nick through slip.

Glenn has changed ends. Wyatt, trying to force a wide one, overbalances. She is stumped. 78 for 2. Timely and critical response from the bowling side. Two new batters at the crease as Bouchier joins her captain, Tammy Beaumont.

A great throw from Gordon has Beaumont scrambling but she’s in. 80 for 2 as the Scot returns from in front of us. It’s not the most beautiful of actions but Gordon does deceive people and revs on the ball means she does tend to get some turn.

Elwiss from the Cromwell Road End. But Beaumont relishes that extra bit of pace and cuts superbly and crisply for four. However Bouchier is run-out to bring Lightning back into the game, at 92 for 3.

Beaumont, who may now be key, skilfully guides Gordon to fine leg for four, before check-driving through the offside cordon. Great stuff and the 100 is up.

Elwiss. Beaumont swings herself off her feet, comically – no consequence, save for the giggles. Then a short one is mishit when pulled… but into safety. 105 for 3 after 12; Lightning were 85.

Classy, wristy, timed clip through midwicket from Beaumont is shockingly misfielded by Higham but then the skipper is gone, inside-edging Gunn onto the sticks. From nowhere, that: Beaumont made 24. Wellington joins Morris.

After 14 overs it boils down to 30 runs required from 36; 6 wickets remaining. Eminently do-able, you would think but credit Lightning for narrowing the game, somewhat. Gordon will bowl.

Three dot balls help. Four. Five. Two off the last. Fine effort from Gordon means there is just a tad more tension in the air. 28 off 30.

Elwiss, the captain is in again. Wellington – who can bat – steers the third ball over mid-off. Four. Then a strangely nervy edge flies out towards point… to safety.

Maybe it gets to Morris. She plays extravagantly across a straight one and is bowled. Five down. And a near run-out follows. Atapattu will bowl the 17th, with 20 required.

She starts with an extraordinarily slow one, which concedes just the one, surprisingly. But nerves are a factor here. Another scramble to get home. Three overs, fifteen runs, for the final.

Gunn, from Cromwell Road. Another über-slow delivery – bold. A hoist to leg invites a catch. A tough one… not taken by du Preez. Then another one drops just short. The batters negotiate the over, just about, and nine are needed from the last two. Glenn will bowl the penultimate.

Wellington reverse-sweeps, executing precisely. Four. Job done?

The tall legspinner does well enough, in truth but cannot entirely stop the runs. Scholfield pulls her convincingly for four to settle it.

Vipers are through, at 145 for 5, with an over spare. One of those games that seemed done early, with almost arrogant ease, went closer. Wyatt’s dynamism and consistently fine catching the difference?

 

THE FINAL.

Vipers will bat, Tammy Beaumont having won the toss and chosen that route. We have a little more cloud than earlier and that has affected the temperatures negatively, a tad. Whether this suits the likes of Shrubsole, for Storm, we’ll soon find out: expect her to bowl soon enough. Game on any moment…

Wales’ offie Claire Nicholas will bowl first up, Bates to face. Single taken. Wyatt again partnering Bates. Four from the over. Now Davies from the Cromwell Road End. Storm notably vocal and energetic in the field.

First boundary is a nicely-judged cut behind point, from Wyatt. Freya Davies has a lovely high hand and dynamic approach. There is a little bounce for her but when she goes full Bates straight-drives for four. 14 for 0 after 2.

Nicholas again. Wyatt advances but misses. Not the next time. Half the universe was sensing a Wyatt Break-out and it comes, sure enough. Six over midwicket. Bates joins in by slashing a wide-ish one through extra. 26 for 0 after 3.

More spin, different spinner as Sharma – surprisingly still only 21 – comes in. Luff might have stopped the sweep but four is taken, followed by four more driven past mid-off. 37 for 0 off 4. Goodish start for the Vipers but no alarms yet for Storm. Davies has changed ends.

Wyatt slogs but with purpose – through extra cover and then over it. What a #KSL she’s having! Clean hitting so limited risk. Then a cute swish of a cut – four more. Could be Wyatt won the semi with a charge to 28: suddenly she has 35 here. Vipers 53 for 0 after 5. Time for Shrubsole.

Knight stops brilliantly at mid-off. Bates edges behind, safely. A wider one is driven out through extra again, signalling danger, for the Storm. Chanceless and positive, so far, for Vipers; 62 for 0 a good return for the powerplay.

Odedra starts with a sloppy one to leg. Wide. Then a slow-mo moment. Firstly her run-up is slowish. Then the delivery is miscued, highish in the bat and the ball loops, painfully slowly away from the bowler. She seems to be *not quite there* – but no. She surges and dives to take a stunner of a one-handed catch, bringing a burst of applause. Bates gone.

But this brings in Beaumont. Wyatt, meanwhile is purring, cutting exquisitely behind square for four. Change again as Knight brings herself in for the eighth.

These batters may be England’s two finest – particularly in the shorter formats. They can scurry, they have skilful hands and what they lack in raw power they tend to make up for in timing and/or invention. Hands are switched, minds are twitchy and alive. Wyatt gets to 50 off 27 with Sharma now bowling from in front of us in the Media Centre.

Storm, led by Priest behind the wicket, are still on it. Verbal, attentive. But Luff lets them down. Bottling (possibly) a well-struck pull to the deep – certainly making a hash of a genuine chance.

Shrubsole draws a glaring error from Beaumont but the ball loops safe. Typically the Viper’s skipper recovers immediately, to guide to third man for four. After ten overs, the batting side are relatively comfortable, on 99 for 1. Shrubsole’s two overs have been decent rather than threatening.

Nicholas has Beaumont in knots but she escapes as the ball skirts everything. Again the batter responds with cruel efficiency; beautiful hands cut and lift high over cover for four. 106 for 1 after 11.

Oh calamity! Odedra spills a clear chance at third man. Mandhana drops the next – even easier – at mid-off. Infuriating and simply not good enough, from either. An awful couple of minutes, culminating in an utter pie from the no-doubt infuriated skipper, carted waaay over Cow Corner by a grateful Wyatt. Momentum strongly with Vipers, now.

Storm need a gift or need to make something happen. Big Score Pending. Beaumont dismisses one to leg, to emphasise the point. 124 for 1 after 13. Meaning close to 200 possible.

Davies is back again. But wow. Beaumont has found Exhibition Mode. Picks one up (and then some) from off her toes: it soars for six, winking back at the gawping fielders. Huge statement of quality.

But finally, somebody holds a catch. Shrubsole, who claims Wyatt, inevitably within a whisker of the boundary. Wyatt made an outstanding 73 and is already a strong candidate for Player of the Match.

Oh jaysus. The previously magbloodynificent Beaumont has only gone and run-out Bouchier for 0. Hideous, hideous episode.

Can Sharma capitalise? No. But she can do that annoying thing where she pulls out of her delivery; neither mankad-attempt (quite) nor genuine issue… just, yeh, irritating.

Possible change in things as Beaumont edges high off Shrubsole and another catch is held. Morris joins Wellington and we are 141 for 4, after 16. It brightens again.

The Aussie (Wellington) reverse-sweeps Sharma for four. Morris sweeps more conventionally, with the same result. 153 for 4, with 3 to come.

Nicholas will bowl. Shrubsole, not a great athlete, dives awkwardly to prevent a straight four but fails. The off-spinner has Wellington l.b.w. before bamboozling the incoming Scholfield with the final delivery. 158 for 5 as Davies comes prancing in.

A sweetly-struck clip to backward square is competently taken by Luff. What really might have been 184 is 164 for 6 as Shrubsole prepares to bowl the last.

A relatively low-key final over suits the Stormtroopers and Shrubsole delivers, bowling to her field and claiming a further wicket. Rudd does spoon her up and over for a cheeky last-ball four but the total of 172, despite being pret-ty impressive, may not be as utterly out of reach as seemed possible when Wyatt and Beaumont were unpicking the attack.

So excellent work from Vipers, mixed effort from Storm… and let’s hope for a thrilling contest.

Priest will face Farrant. Little bit of in-swing still there. Wide, to Mandhana. Then drama. Mandhana rather carelessly lifts one towards mid-on. It seems clear that Kelly has misjudged it but no. She launches forward late to take a fine, if somehow also non-stylish catch! Gift, for Vipers. 2 for 1 after 1.

Lauren Bell is in at Priest. Single. Knight will now face. The finest of edges beats the sprawling keeper – four. Then an l.b. appeal – but na. Followed by a flourish of the hands and four through forty-five.

Bell loses that line again, though, for a biggish leg-side wide… followed by a clear offside wide… and a marginal leg-side wide. Another looong over finishes with Storm on 16 for 1.

Priest middles Farrant through midwicket for a mighty four. Knight looks goodish early, too, timing through the same area.

Bates, going slightly wide, has Priest missing rather strangely, twice. A straighter one is clubbed downtown for four. It may be cooler out there but the day – suddenly the September day – could still hardly be better. Wyatt will bowl the fifth; off-spin from around.

There is talk that Wyatt might yet break into the (Very Occasional) Test side, should her bowling develop. She does give it a decent tweak. But Priest helps herself to something short and something wide, for three boundaries, in total.

Bell going yorker length. But then overdoes it – full toss clumped for four by Priest. 50 up, in the over and the powerplay concludes on that figure, for 1 down. Enter Wellington, with her right-arm leggies.

This young woman has something. A real beauty loops and turns sharply, exposing Priest for the stumping. 50 for 2, bringing Wilson to the crease. Rather beautifully and atmospherically, we have shadows.

Courageously and with conviction, Heather Knight is sweeping Wellington. Connects for four. Good contest.

Bell is back and placing it there but still apparently challenging Wilson, who falls, making the shot. Bell contributes to the extras column again, with another no-ball – her fourth or fifth, I think, of the day. Free hit makes only one.

Wilson steps out to claim another boundary off the youngster. We are 66 for 2 after 8.

The same batter times another sweep, off Wellington, moving to 8. Knight at this point has an authoritative 23 off 21, which becomes 27, with the stroke of the day, a fabulous cover drive.

Wilson responds with a straight drive for four off Morris’s opener. This is brewing nicely, now. Decent shout for l.b.w. – umpire not interested and of course no DRS. Comms inform us Vipers were 99 for 1 after 10 overs: Storm are 80 for 2.

Hah. Did the announcement prompt the blow to the extra boundary, from Knight? Maybe not. But it’s a sign that there’s a) some catching up to do b) the batters are on it. Given that the Vipers’ innings did slightly peter out, this feels a contest – particularly with both Knight and Wilson striking so cleanly.

Ah. Wilson holes out to Wyatt, inevitably, in the deep, off Farrant, for 18. Luff joins her captain, with 83 needed, off 53. That captain again responds, with a towering, swept six, to square leg. 98 for 3, off 12.

Wellington drops short, Knight cuts and Tarrant misfields. Four. Luff, though, is caught behind, presumably off the glove, bringing in Sharma. Knight needs a partner to help her shine.

Bell misfields, poorly, as Sharma reverse-sweeps. Four. 10 off the over.

Morris now, to Sharma as we build to what we hope will be a grand finale – for this tournament, the Super League, remember. A loose ball is carted to leg. Knight has 50.

Bates, from in front of us. Medium pace. Short. Again thrashed with confidence for six, by Knight. Eleven from the over, 46 needed from 30. *Quietly exciting*.

Bell, with a job to do, from the Cromwell Road End. A test.

Single. Single. Six, again from Knight, who may be on for something extraordinary, here. Then more issues for the unfortunate young bowler. In short a Significantly Costly Over. Things have narrowed to 29 from 24 as Wellington steps up to the plate once more.

You feel that if Knight stays there, Storm get this. And I reckon she knows that. A poor, poor, nervy ball from Wellington… is missed. Six only, from the over.

23 from 18. Wonderful and tense. Knight must get the strike – Sharma has 21, somehow but at this point is missing as much as hitting.

Wyatt is bowling the 18th. Sharma sweeps ver-ry fine, for four. Then hoists, straight, for FOUR! I’m too scrambled to count but I think that over went for 11. STORM NEED TWELVE FROM TWELVE TO TAKE THE TROPHY.

I’ll have what Sharma’s drinking. She’s *found something*  and found another four, through midwicket. Bates must stem the tide. Two great balls might help. A smooth but blistering drive over extra won’t – won’t help the Vipers. Sharma and Knight look to be taking this home, magnificently.

THE CAPTAIN, HEATHER KNIGHT, BLAZES OVER STRAIGHTISH MID-OFF… AND WESTERN STORM HAVE ONLY GONE AND DONE IT!! Wow. What a fab-yoo-luss finish.  Fabulous from Knight, from Sharma (actually), fabulous from Wyatt, earlier, fabulous for women’s cricket. Brilliant, enjoyable sport. Wow.

Right. *Takes deep breath*. Forgive any typo’s. I’m off to wish Sparky O’Leary all the best. Will be back to reflect, no doubt. 

Final Word has to be for Heather Knight. And maybe for Danni Wyatt. The former played something of an Innings For the Ages to bring Western Storm home, in the final. It was controlled, it was powerful in every sense, it was classy. She hit three thrillingly-timed sixes as well as did the glueing-the-whole-effort-together thing. Magnificent and utterly vindicating, after a heavily challenging season – a season that might have buried plenty of  the rest.

Wyatt – voted Player of the Series in this last KSL – was again the dasher on the day with the bat, playing two hugely entertaining knocks. She also seemed to take about thirty catches in the deep, where again she looked to be playing at a simply higher level. She’s a gem, she’s a laff and she’s worth travelling to watch. Now… I travel home.